News and Press

Fisher Investments is a well-known name in financial news and literature. CEO Ken Fisher has written a monthly column for Forbes magazine for 30 years, and frequently appears in the financial media, including Bloomberg TV and CNBC. Ken Fisher's views along with Fisher Investments’ research have been showcased across the US, Britain, Germany and beyond. Members of Fisher Investments’ editorial and research staff regularly contribute to our daily market and financial commentary website, MarketMinder.com and to other financial publications including Investor’s Business Daily, The Street, Real Clear Markets and more.

By , Forbes,

Average returns aren’t normal. People may expect average, but they’ll rarely get it.

By , Interactive Investor,

If you're tempted to wait for the election in November, don't - stocks are forward-looking, says Ken Fisher.

By , Forbes,

Honor your net worth with great stocks like these for the rest of this long bull market.

By , Forbes,

Fourth quarters of midterm-election years are positive 86.4% of the time.

By , Interactive Investor,

The UK has a chance to import technology firms and reap the unfathomable benefits that come with them.

By , Equities.com,

With President Obama signing an Executive Order to cap some borrowers’ repayments at 10% of their annual income, and with the Senate squashing a bill to allow borrowers to refinance at lower rates two days later, this is a hot election-year issue. However, the data overwhelmingly suggest this political hot potato isn’t an economic issue.

By , Financial Times,

Smaller shares’ lead comes in short bursts.

By , Investor's Business Daily,
By , Interactive Investor,

If investors want growth, they must accept the risk of losing their capital.

By , Forbes,

Skeptics are turning into optimists. Looks like it’s full speed ahead.

By , Financial Times,

Investors worried about toppy markets in 1995, yet shares rose for another four years.

By , Equities.com,

Before you run for the hills with visions of 2000 dancing through your head, breathe. Some corners of the sector might have their issues, but a broad bubble this is not. Here are 11 reasons why you needn’t fear.

By , Interactive Investor,

Six weeks after George Osborne killed the requirement for most pensioners to buy an annuity, financial media is teeming with advice for your newly-liberated pension pot. Most is rubbish.

By , Financial Times,

Last month, we covered how to tell if your adviser is putting you first – developing a plan to reach your long-term financial goals and giving you the tough-love advice you need to reach them. You-first advisers won’t indulge your fear and greed impulses, won’t encourage you to zig and zag.

While zigzagging is bad, sometimes big tactical moves may make sense.

By , Forbes,

The key is to stay on your toes—and always expect the unexpected.

By , Interactive Investor,

Ken Fisher warns that, despite the introduction of RDR, investors must still beware of who they choose as financial adviser.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

These days, it seems most pundits have one word to describe the stock market: "overvalued." Read the full story on Investors.com

By , Financial Times,

Most humans make bad investors. That’s why they need advisers

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Can the Fed end boom and bust?  Read the full story on Investors.com.

By , BNN,

Part 3 - BNN talks to billionaire investor Ken Fisher - founder, chairman and CEO of Fisher Investments - whose firm has more than US$46 billion under management. He'll tell us where he's finding value.

By , BNN,

Part 2 - BNN talks to billionaire investor Ken Fisher - founder, chairman and CEO of Fisher Investments - whose firm has more than US$46 billion under management. He'll tell us where he's finding value.

By , BNN,

Part 1 - BNN talks to billionaire investor Ken Fisher - founder, chairman and CEO of Fisher Investments - whose firm has more than US$46 billion under management. He'll tell us where he's finding value.

By , Interactive Investor,

Ken Fisher hopes Janet Yellen will forget "everything that made her screw up" during the 2008 financial crisis if another occurs.

By , Forbes,

Stocks with plump margins will now be the ones beating the market.

By , Financial Times,

Technology is colliding. From it will come ideas none of us can envisage.

By , Forbes,

The bears are suffering from boy-who-cried-wolf syndrome.

By , Interactive Investor,

Can the world economy still advance?  These days it's fashionable to say no. Sceptics claim we'll never again see the amazing gains that came with the industrial and tech revolutions. They're wrong.

By , Forbes,

Consensus sentiment, particularly among professionals (who as a group are almost always wrong), tightly clusters around a 6% S&P 500 return for this year. When sentiment clusters like that my research shows stocks almost always do much better or much worse. Expect better!

By , Financial Times,

At least BoE governor has some commercial experience – the Yanks deserve better than Yellen.

By , Interactive Investor,

Most forecast a successful year for equities in 2014, yet stocks don't follow the herd. In fact, they love proving people wrong, says Ken Fisher.

By , Forbes,

I have been writing for this magazine for 29-plus years, and with this issue I pass Lucien O. Hooper to become the third-longest-running “expert” columnist in FORBES’ 96-year history. Lucien may have been the most popular ever for what Steve Forbes recalls as his “conversational way,” and even though he died 25 years ago, his investing lessons still hold today.

By , Financial Times,

Every time the stock market falls, I read that it’s because investors fear higher interest rates. This is just such rot.

By , Interactive Investor,

The world needs supply-side monetary policy. Thanks to the US Federal Reserve, it gets demand-side. But what is the difference and why is it important?

By , Forbes,

It just won’t happen. Except for the euphoric end of bull market peaks, folks always fear recession ahead—more so right now due to the government shutdown hangover and the eventual end of quantitative easing.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Where did Milton Friedman go?

If you answered "the great blue yonder," you're right. But that doesn't answer the metaphorical side.

By , Financial Times,

They say all central bankers are birds – easy-money doves or inflation-obsessed hawks. So what sort of bird is soon-to-be Federal Reserve head Janet Yellen?

By , Forbes,

Long before folks fretted the demise of “quantitative easing,” I fretted its existence. It proved the reverse of its image, an antistimulus, and we’ve done okay not because of it but despite it. With its demise forthcoming, I’m bullish on banks, relative to the market.

By , Interactive Investor,

Ignore the chatter - they don't know. Fed heads don't show their true feathers until they're in office. You can't game it yet.

By , Equities.com,

The government shutdown is two weeks old and though piecemeal legislation reopened parts of government, many “nonessential” departments remain closed. Among the things that didn’t close, however, are politicians’ mouths.

By , TheStreet.com,

Do headlines and many investors think they are? Yes! And that's a great sign this bull market has room to run.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Are state-run banks the answer to the world's economic troubles?  That's the question posed on a popular news site this week, with pundits weighing in on both sides.

By , Financial Times,

Economics is simply too important to leave to economists, who often deal in unproven assumption and theory.

By , Finanacial Times,

Economics is simply too important to leave to economists, who often deal in unproven assumption and theory.

By , TheStreet.com,

Oct. 17: That's the day the Treasury Department expects to exhaust the "extraordinary measures" used to pay the bills since the debt ceiling reset in May.

By , TheStreet,

Global warming. Scientists can't seem to agree on its existence, and politicians can't seem to agree on how to address it. Or if it exists.

By , Forbes,

This month and next you’re sure to hear raucous claims regarding how treacherous these months are.

By , Reuters,

Wall Street often faces a wall of worry, the issues that can halt a market rally, yet the fears that haunt investors now seem to persist far longer than they did in the past, said Ken Fisher, the billionaire investor and author, in an interview.

By , Interactive Investor,

Great news: quantitative easing is ending soon.  Yes, you read that right. People fret QE's end will be a bad thing, but it isn't

CNBC,

9/18/2013, CNBC

CNBC's MarketCall - Reactions to the Federal Reserve's decision not to taper and discuss the impacts it will have on the markets.

By , Financial Times,

False fears are everywhere. Take earnings, they are growing again, as they have during this entire upswing. Investors fear it won’t last but they are wrong - they should expect more growth ahead.

By , Equities.com,

If at first you don’t succeed, try again. That seems to be China’s motto when it comes to financial reform

By , Interactive Investor,

False fears run rampant today. Take earnings. They keep growing and beating expectations, as they have this entire expansion, but investors fear it can't last. When it does, the surprise is bullish. Expect good earnings ahead.

By , Forbes,

From an investor standpoint Great Britain has been plagued by snipes who have bad-mouthed the U.K.–which represents 9% of the world stock market–for years.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

In case you haven't heard, a time bomb is supposedly ticking away in China: $1.7 trillion (at least) of allegedly toxic regional debt. And, apparently, when it blows up, it'll take China's entire financial system down with it, wreaking economic and stock market havoc globally.

By , Financial Times,

What do Ben Bernanke, Edward Snowden and Meredith Whitney have in common? The answer is that they are old, old stories.

By , TheStreet.com,

What a difference a year makes: Twelve months ago, investors believed the eurozone was on the brink of collapse, and they seemed desperate for the European Central Bank to save the union by purchasing massive amounts of debt of the so-called PIIGS (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain).

By , Investor's Business Daily,

One seemingly can't read the news these days without seeing headlines bemoaning what could become of the US economy and stock markets once the Fed scales back its quantitative easing (QE) program.

By , Interactive Investor,

Long-term bond rates have risen globally - just a bit - making bond prices fall, hurting bondholders somewhat in the near term.

By , TheStreet,

With gold's big decline over the last two years, many may be searching for answers about what's to come. And suggestions abound -- some hinging on the notion gold can protect your portfolio from inflation.

By , Equities.com,

What is the actual value of an annuity's guaranteed lifetime income? Read the full story at Equities.com

By , Forbes,

As summer’s dog days melt into a daze, please remember that ubiquitous worries usually melt away, too. The fret-about-it list seems most benign now, in my view, but the fret-o-meter still registers within its historic range. Why? Because worrying is human.

By , Forbes,

Need more evidence political “deadlines” are effectively pirate code (i.e., more like guidelines)? The Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare, whichever you prefer) employer mandate has been delayed for one year.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

EU finance ministers made an unexpected breakthrough Thursday—after months of politicking and foot-dragging, they agreed on common rules for how future bank failures will be handled.

By , TheStreet.com,

Apparently, Chinese authorities are investigating what's behind late-June interbank funding rate spikes and equity volatility.

Our advice: Look in the mirror

By , Interactive Investor,

I'm going to say something here you won't read anywhere else. Ending quantitative easing (QE) won't be bearish as everyone believes. It will be hugely bullish. I say this, knowing I won't convince any of you. Yet, this is the easiest thing in the world to see.

By , Forbes,

What more can we learn from the recent rush to label a few weeks of yield volatility a “lost decade” for bonds?

Bonds Can And Do Have Negative Returns

By , Forbes,

What can we learn from the recent spate of “lost decade for bonds” headlines?

Everyone Loves Forecasting Lost Decades!

By , Forbes,

Some people consider hedge funds to be the smart money on Wall Street. But recent moves by a few notable fund managers have me wondering whether the group shouldn’t be considered the new greater fools of the market.

Bloomberg,

Bloomberg, 6/21/2013

Billionaire investor Ken Fisher talks about investor sentiment and the outlook for the U.S. stock market. Fisher, founder and chairman of Fisher Investments, spoke at Bloomberg's office in Seattle on June 19. (Source: Bloomberg)

By , Bloomberg,

Billionaire investor Ken Fisher said the U.S. stock market rally that began in 2009 is only in its “middle” stages because most investors still underestimate the strength of the economy.

CNBC,

CNBC, 6/20/2013

CNBC's "The Call" - Ken Fisher, CEO of Fisher Investment explains why markets should cheer the end of QE.

By , TheStreet.com,

Housing's been hot lately, with ultra-low supply sending prices higher and fueling a wave of construction starts--a small but noteworthy economic tailwind.

By , Forbes,

The UK’s Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards must secretly love bankers, love Ireland or both.

I’ll explain.

By , Forbes,

What can we learn from the non-event the dred monster sequester turned out to be? Politicians will never learn.

By , Forbes,

It appears that the Affordable Care Act might not be so affordable. Well, depending on your point of view.

By , Interactive Investor,

Why should investors care about the US Leading Economic Indicators index (LEI) hugely beating expectations in April? Because it's the same general story in the UK - where LEI is also advancing - and more evidence the US, UK and world economies are doing better than most think. And it's a reminder to ignore media blather.

By , Equities.com,

College is expensive—and getting more so in recent years, with costs advancing at a rate far exceeding overall inflation. And many students borrow (occasionally heavily) to meet the expense—including some who have no immediate hope of repayment after graduation.

By , Forbes,

I was recently asked how it is that I can regularly tout certain stocks because they’re cheap and at the same time recommend others at what seem to be selling at high valuations.

By , Forbes,

A prediction: With stocks up nicely year-to-date, we’ll soon see myriad headlines warning us stocks have come too far, too fast, and we should “lock in our gains,” take our bat and ball and go home.

By , TheStreet.com,

To many observers, March's U.S. trade report was a smashing success: Compared to March 2012, the trade deficit fell 11%!

By , Forbes,

Amid the sturm und drang over IRS tomfoolery (I needn’t say “alleged” here, because in the best of times, the US tax code is steeped in tomfoolery), folks are missing a huge opportunity: Let’s just scrap whole darn thing.

By , Forbes,

China’s communist government and international humanitarian groups might seem like odd bedfellows, but they seem united in their dislike of the World Bank’s annual Doing Business survey—the 2013 survey is available now. For different reasons, of course.

By , Equities.com,

Imagine you’re running a country whose economy could perhaps use a bit of a boost. You could just spend some money on a few major construction projects, but you’d rather see domestic businesses grow more—especially since some have struggled to maintain high profit growth.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

By now, you've likely heard of the woppping energy bonanza know as the Shale Revolution. Thanks to hydraulic fracturing (aka fracturing), the US is awash with cheap natural gas, giving energy firms a new source of revenue and businesses nationwide cheaper energy costs.

By , Interactive Investor,

America's Leading Economic Indicator index (LEI) fell in March. Trouble ahead? No - think longer term and globally. Worldwide, leading indicators show more growth ahead. Buy it.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

With Max Baucus (D-MT) announcing his retirement come 2014, expect gridlock to increase from here—an excellent thing.  Stocks prefer legislative inaction to the uncertainty inherent in looming material legislation.

By , Forbes,

Good(ish) news! Headline GDP since 2007 may get revised up a bit this July. However, it will (likely) be tied to GDP accounting changes by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), not an update to actual economic data.

By , TheStreet.com,

Over the years, many things have been wrongly cited as inflation drivers. High resource costs, low unemployment, high oil prices, extreme weather and even an economy with healthy demand have been falsely accused at times

By , Forbes,

What is the most common investor mistake? Trading–getting in and getting out at all the wrong times, for all the wrong reasons.

By , Forbes,

The DJIA surpassed its prior peak to much fanfare recently, and the S&P 500 Price Index to less. (Oddly, zero attention was paid when the S&P 500 Total Return Index surpassed its prior peak fully a year ago.) With the eurozone economy still flirting with recession and US stocks outperforming much of the developed world of late, all eyes are on the US.

By , Equities.com,

In soccer (or football/futbol, depending on your nationality), an “own goal” occurs when a player scores a goal against his or her own team on accident. It’s widely considered one of the most embarrassing sports blunders there is—right up there with fumbling the snap in (American) football, missing a slam dunk in basketball or striking out on a bunt attempt in baseball. And for France’s footballers and their fans, President Francois Hollande committed an own goal this week after revising his “tax the wealthy” plan.

By , Interactive Investor,

Invest better by watching America's gun-control debate.

No, guns have nothing to do with stocks. But often, in life and stocks, popular cultural belief and reality wildly differ - making you see the world wrong. And seeing the world wrong causes investing errors.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

"Japan has run into a big wall...and we have turned invward looking. If Japan becomes the only one that turns inward, there is no chance for our growth. No businesses would want to invest in such a country and talented people would not be interested.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

In every trade, there's a buyer and a seller.  Similaryly, in every loan, there's a borrower (debtor) and a lender (creditor)—pretty basic lesson, to be sure. But it's one that's often overlooked in discussion of what the Fed calls it's "extraordinary accommodative monetary policy"—essentially, quantitative easing (QE).

By , TheStreet.com,

There've been so many recent examples of nations making fiscal choices at odds with long-term economic aims, it's easy to miss choices aimed at wooing corporations and job creators to their shores.

By , Equities.com,

Cyprus, in case you haven’t heard, is in a tight spot. It needs €17 billion ASAP to keep paying the bills, otherwise it faces bankruptcy, disorderly default and—potentially—a eurozone exit.

By , Forbes,

What do sugar and pogo sticks have in common?

Not much, unless you want to use pogo sticks to illuminate a concept, broadly accepted by most of humanity, known as comparative advantage.

By , TheStreet.com,

Four years into the current bull, with sentiment waffling between skeptical and optimistic, it seems we're at least past the halfway point -- typically large-cap stocks' time to shine. Yet, small-caps have had a nice run lately, prompting many investors to ask: Will this countertrend rally stay, or will big stocks soon regain leadership?

By , Forbes,

Just days after this bull market’s fourth birthday, the S&P 500 is mere basis points from its all-time high of 1565.15.

By , TheStreet.com,

Twenty-three percent. That's the average annualized return of the S&P 500 during the bull market that turns four this weekend (not including dividends). By that measure, the current ranks as the fifth strongest bull market since the S&P's 1926 inception.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Last week, Denmark's government proposed a new plan to create jobs and stimulate growth in the country's struggling economy, which reportedly shrank 0.6% in 2012.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban shouldn't have anything in common. The former stands for liberty and the rule of law, and he seems not to mind being subject to the electorate's whims. The latter's a proto-fascist who's waged war on freedom and wiped out many checks and balances on executive power.

By , Interactive Investor,

What can the fourth quarter's strong US corporate earnings growth tell us? That the world is in vastly better shape than most fear - very bullish.

By , Forbes,

Hundreds of investors ask me questions each year about the dilemmas they confront. Their worst problem? Uncertainty.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

In case you've been living in a bunker, the "sequester" (maybe) kicks in March 1.

I'm hoping it happens for one very specific reason: If the sequester proceeds, it robs politicians of a go-to wedge issue they can repeatedly dredge up as heated, campaing-fundraising fodder, then slap it with a sloppy Band-aid and push it out to another politically expedient future time.  Rinse, repeat.

By , Forbes,

What can Q4’s revised GDP growth tell us about the sequester? That it won’t impact overall 2013 economic growth much (if at all).

By , Equities.com,

If you haven’t paid much attention to Cyprus’s bailout negotiations, I suggest you start: There’s a plan afoot that could, if enacted, set a dangerous precedent for private property rights in the eurozone.

By , Equities.com,

President Obama’s recent State of the Union address likely sounded akin to any of his 2008 and 2012 campaign speeches for most folks: Support growth, create new jobs, boost investment, encourage green energy, promote free trade—all perfectly noble, seemingly good aims. (Whether they come to fruition and the shape they take remain to be seen.)

By , Forbes,

What can the UK expect after being downgraded? Almost certainly, lots of political finger-pointing and hyperbolic headlines. But also, quite possibly, lower interest rates

By , Forbes,

The Fed’s latest minutes showed the FOMC plans to maintain its “accommodative” stance until certain unemployment and economic targets are hit. Which is feeding some fear the Fed’s “easing” is inflating asset bubbles. (The quotes are intentional.)

By , Investor's Business Daily,

"The explanations for persistent inflation are many: uncontrollably rising wages; OPEC oil-price increases; droughts or poor harvests; large government budget deficits. The list of 'causes' of inflation changes with the circumstances. If we were to take them seriously, we would conclude that inflation may be caused by nearly everything. None of these causes, however, can explain inflation consistently over time or across countries."

By , Forbes,

The Fed's QE-infinity policy has raised concerns of an impending inflation spike.  To know whether such fears are warranted, it's important to understand what inflation is and what it is not.

By , TheStreet.com,

Most Asian markets are closed this week, but the region's far from quiet: It's the Lunar New Year! As folks everywhere celebrate with scrumptious feasts and red envelopes, we think it's a great time to see what's in store for China in the year of the snake.

By , Equities.com,

A question I’ve noted in the media of late: With sentiment noticeably more positive these days, should we be worried about the bull market’s imminent end?

By , Forbes,

The Big Easy. No, I’m not talking about the movie or New Orleans. I’m talking about my current approach to finding winning stocks.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

There's a hot new trend in global banking these days: the ring-fence. A sort of Glass-Steagall lite, the ring-fence would force banks to build a Chinese wall between their retail and investment operations, separating each segment's assets, liabilities and management teams from the other.

By , Interactive Investor,

The Dow hit 14000. Time to celebrate? Time to hide? No. Time to ignore the Dow Jones Industrials Average and this meaningless milestone.

By , Forbes,

It’s tough out there for a credit rating agency.

It appears S&P is being sued by the Justice Department. Lest anyone think this is payback for its downgrade of Uncle Sam, the suit will allege S&P played a key role in the 2008 credit crisis—issuing too rosy ratings on mortgage-backed securities and other collateralized debt obligations when they knew such securities were toxic.

By , Forbes,

US stocks ended January up 5.2%—their best start since 1997. So where are all the January effect headlines?

By , Forbes,

Last time, I wrote about four issues investors should remember in 2013. Now, here are three stories likely to hog headlines in 2013, but probably won’t have the big, negative impact many fear.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

A record 7.9 million people tuned in for the recent US premier of Downton Abbey's third season—but if you ask me, that's far too few. The episode teaches a crash course in how not to invest—a course every investor on Earth should heed.

By , Equities.com,

New Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe got his wish this week: The Bank of Japan (BOJ) boosted its inflation target to 2% (rebranding it as a “goal”) and committed to open-ended monthly asset purchases of ¥13 trillion ($143 billion) to get there. And all Japan’s problems were … complicated.

By , Equities.com,

New Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe got his wish this week: The Bank of Japan (BOJ) boosted its inflation target to 2% (rebranding it as a “goal”) and committed to open-ended monthly asset purchases of ¥13 trillion ($143 billion) to get there. And all Japan’s problems were … complicated.

By , The Street,

Thanks to the joint efforts of the World Trade Organization and Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, the case for free trade got a whole lot stronger last week. 

By , Forbes,

Despite constant fears of a new recession, the US and global economies have grown for 13 straight quarters (likely 14, counting Q4). Not gangbusters, but growth is growth. And better-than-expected growth likely continues.

By , Forbes,

Negatives continue to abound. So why do I expect stocks to shine in 2013? Because I’m not a cow, I’m a bull. Let me explain: Most negatives you hear about are well known and widely discussed, digested and already priced into stocks.

By , Equities.com,

With much of the world experiencing slower economic growth over the past year, I’ve seen a surge in the number of editorials forecasting a Japan-style “lost decade” in some nations. Based on a quick Internet search, the US, UK, Ireland and South Korea are just some of those purportedly at risk—sure, historically they’ve been resilient, but this time it’s different.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

The Consumer Protection Financial Bureau (CFPB), an agency set up as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, has been tasked with the relatively unobjectionable aim of protecting consumers of financial products and services. Fair enough. No one really wants consumers to be unprotected. And yet, there are already lawsuits working their ways through the court system challenging the body's constitutionality. And to me, this is hardly surprising.

Reuters,

Long-time investor Ken Fisher says fundamentals support a bull run in U.S. equities and feels the largest cap stocks like Johnson & Johnson, Home Depot and Germany's BASF will lead the way.

By , Forbes,

The short-lived debate over whether minting trillion dollar platinum coins could solve America’s fiscal restraint (or, rather, lack thereof) appears to have ended—the Treasury and Fed have both declared “no way." Which clears the way for a fresh debate on raising the debt ceiling the traditional way (i.e. the way it’s been done 105 times before).

By , Interactive Investor,

Despite constant fears, global, US and British shares ended 2012 up nicely - amazingly all up 11%. Expect still bigger returns in 2013 - the biggest shares up most.

Reuters,

Ken Fisher, author of "Plan Your Prosperity", discusses the biggest mistakes investors make when planning for retirement and what they should do to avoid any pitfalls.

By , Forbes,

How far must the S&P move to breach past highs?

It’s a trick question.

By , Equities.com,

Twenty-three years after the Iron Curtain’s fall, there’s a new dividing line in Eastern Europe: A sharp contrast in quality of life between those nations where free markets and free society have flourished, and those where the state keeps an iron grip.

By , Forbes,

Believe it or not, I’m for fewer jobs, not more. Throughout 2012 we heard politicians and pundits of all stripes yammering endlessly on the need for job growth—that we don’t have enough jobs. It’s pure rubbish.

By , The Street,

As the U.S. draws ever-closer to the fiscal geological formation that is anything but a cliff, investors seem eager to handicap what might happen should politicians fail to find a workaround.

By , Forbes,

With fiscal cliff fears hitting a fevered pitch, I had the chance recently to sit down with Ken Fisher and query him on his views of this widespread investor concern.

By , Interactive Investor,

The US fiscal cliff battle drags on. Taxes will rise on 1 January - investors fear if a deal isn't reached in time, higher taxes will cause a recession and bear market. It's a false fear, and false fears are always bullish.

By , Forbes,

Says Fisher of the pharma stalwart, “It has near endless top-notch brand names, and a stream of new products will capture growth from an aging developed-world demographic plus new emerging middle classes overseas—all wrapped in a classically cheap stock.”

By , Investor’s Business Daily,

MarketMinder's View: This echoes a sentiment we’ve written about many times in the past—if you tax something, you’ll get less of it. Put simply, despite wildly variable marginal tax rates, the historical record shows US federal tax revenues tend to be quite stable. That said, we’re skeptical either party’s plan necessarily meets their “goal,” considering both hinge on long-range forecasts. For more, see our 10/01/2012 cover story, “Fiscal Cliff, Meet Fiscal Norm.”

By , The Street,

The debt ceiling debate seems to have returned from the dead. But as our boss Ken Fisher has said, what many folks miss is that the debt ceiling is a purely political (and arbitrary) machination. And it's one that members of Congress aren't terribly motivated to fix, so it's unlikely to kick the bucket anytime soon.

By , InvestorPlace,

Mid-September’s announcement of the Fed’s now third round of quantitative easing was preceded by heated debate. Monetary hawks warned of the heightened risk of out-of-control inflation due to more Fed stimulus. Doves countered that the Fed should do more to stimulate the economy to lower a persistently high unemployment rate.

By , Forbes,

Risk is paramount for most investors. And well it should! But I suspect, for many investors, risk and volatility are always and everywhere interchangeable. Volatility is a key risk—but it isn’t the only one (a point made in the latest book I co-authored with Ken Fisher, Plan Your Prosperity.) There are myriad risks investors should consider. For example, interest rate risk.

By , Forbes,

A key concern for many investors: If a fiscal cliff deal doesn’t happen soon, will higher corporate and dividend taxes hit retirees counting on dividend income particularly hard? A better question: If you need portfolio income, why are you relying on high dividends primarily? (A subject tackled in Plan Your Prosperity, the latest book I co-authored with Ken Fisher.)

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Sunday, the autonomous Spanish region of Catalonia voted in snap-elections called by regional President Artur Mas. He, his Convergence and Union Party (CiU) and members of other separatist parties in the region hoped to use the elections to secure a mandate for independence from Spain, paving the way for a referendum on the issue.

By , The Street,

While many were focused on China's changing leadership following last week's 18th National Party Congress, another far more subtle but potentially very impactful change also occurred: China's state-run media replaced bank lending with "total social financing" as its preferred lending indicator.

By , Financial Times,

Everyone fears America’s fiscal cliff, so don’t you dare. Others are already doing it for you for free, as a favour. So thank them.

By , Equities.com,

When UK Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne announced Mark Carney will succeed Sir Mervyn King as BOE chief next year, the surprise was universal: The Brits picked a Canadian?!

By , Forbes,

The fiscal cliff will be of utmost importance! Politicians will be very serious about it. They’ll go on Sunday talk shows, write earnest op-eds, furrow brows and point fingers. They want it solved! They’re working on it! Those other people across the aisle are stalling. We’ve made proposals. They’ve rejected them. They hate the middle class. We love the middle class. Etc., etc.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Of all the headwinds plaguing Japan's economy in recent years, one of the biggest is political uncertainty. Japan's had seven prime ministers in as many years, making it difficult for leadership to enact meaningful economic reform—something Japan could use in spades. And with the lower house of Parliament dissolved November 15 and a snap election now scheduled for December 16, the revolving doors may soon turn again.

By , Forbes,

Politicking over the fiscal cliff has begun in earnest—highlighting the fact both sides now disavow the cliff (somehow forgetting it was entirely of their making).

By , Forbes,

Stock-market-wise, as we fade from this emotionally excessive election cycle, there are three things I want you to focus on. First, don’t believe too much in your political ideology relative to how the economy and markets will do. Most folks make that mistake. Those whose side loses typically see a dismal future. Don’t bet on it.

By , Equities.com,

As South Korea’s presidential election campaign heats up, expect one rallying cry to dominate all others: “economic democratization.”

By , Interactive Investor,

Many investors, mostly American Republicans and non-American conservatives, fear President Obama's re-election will be toxic for shares. Nonsense - there is scant clear evidence either party is materially better for shares in the long-term. But there is a lot to be bullish about following this election that goes unnoticed.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

If you're hunting for higher yields, be sure to watch your back.

By , The Street,

European and Asian leaders, including French President Francois Hollande, have urged one another to do what they can to free global trade, citing protectionism as a risk to the global economy. To that we say: Hear, hear!

By , Forbes,

The investor class seems particularly morose over a second Obama term. In their view, conventional wisdom is a Democrat is toxic for stocks. Naturally, Democrats will say the stock market always does better under a Democratic president.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

It's to be expected in an election year politicians will do what they can to create distinctions among themselves—and among us citizens, too. After all, if there aren't clear differences, how are folks to determine whom to vote for? In our view, though, those distinctions are overall largely false, in the sense politicians are all, at their core, politicians.

By , iStockAnalyst,

Friday's first estimate of US Q3 GDP showed growth of +2.0% in the quarter, an uptick from Q2's +1.3% rate, exceeding analysts' estimates. Under the hood, there were some stronger points and some weaker, but overall there's little here representing a sharp divergence from other recent reports.

By , Forbes,

With the election looming, both parties now clamor the “fiscal cliff” must be leveled—including President Obama who recently claimed the sequestration “will not happen." (How quick politicians forget this is a predicament of their making.)

By , The Street,

When China's new leaders take power in the coming months, they will face a Herculean task: Reforming the nation's bloated state-owned or controlled enterprises (SOEs). Or so vowed Wang Yong, head of China's State-Owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC), in an Oct. 24 address to China's bi-monthly legislative session.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

When it comes to China-related fears, two have dominated lately: The fear China's economy suffers a hard landing and takes the world down with it, and the fear China's economy will overtake the US's.

By , Forbes,

News stories in recent days have touted America’s recent surge in oil production, positing the US could produce more oil than Saudi Arabia by 2020.

By , The Street,

Simplicity and understanding are two cornerstones of successful long-term investing, yet it truly seems much of the investment industry hasn't grasped this, doesn't agree or otherwise prefers not to operate transparently.

By , Forbes,

Last month I introduced the notion of concentrating on only stocks larger than the global markets’ $80 billion average market capitalization. There are now only 70 such megacaps.

By , Interactive Investor,

Many investors fear the US "fiscal cliff" - that automatic spending cuts and tax hikes starting in January will cause a big recession. No. The fiscal cliff simply won't happen. And fear of a false factor is always bullish.

By , Equities.com,

In 2012, financial news has been dominated by Europe, China and the US—with the eurozone’s troubles, China’s economic wobbling and the US’s looming “fiscal cliff,” investors are hyper focused on these areas and how they could impact global stocks.

By , The Street,

Every four years, we're treated to the spectacle of two men jockeying for power in the world's most powerful nation -- and predictably, this involves ample fact-stretching and twisting. At Fisher Investments, we're politically agnostic: We prefer neither party over the other, finding much to dislike (and occasionally something to cheer) in both parties' policies and proposals.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Dear reader, you may have made it this far—and thank you for that—but I'm not delusional enough to think you'll nod with me for long. Even if I temporarily possessed Hemingway's pen and Churchill's persuasion powers, you likely won't slide my way. You see, this is politics, and I'm repeatedly told this presidential election is critical. But in my view, it's less important to your portfolio than one tangential point I'll get to later. (Yeah, I know, you don't buy it. And you probably won't later, either.)

By , Forbes,

News to no one: Stock returns in the 2000s were overall flat—US stocks annualized -1% returns. Even today, over three years since the end of the recession and bear market, a popular media meme is because returns had been bad and we just had a big recession, America is headed into a “lost decade” of low market returns and poor growth.

By ,

For the past few years, one question has puzzled UK economic policymakers: Why aren’t banks lending more? Or specifically, why haven’t the Bank of England’s (BOE) Asset Purchase Programme (quantitative easing), Project Merlin or the National Loan Guarantee Scheme significantly increased the amount banks lend to households and small businesses?

By , The Street,

This November, a very important election will take place. The result, many say, could determine the fate of one of the world's biggest regional economies.

Investors Chronicle,

Ken Fisher's investment management firm has been consistently and successfully correct about developed market stocks in recent times. In this video, Miles Standish of Fisher Investments UK talks to me about the outlook for 2013 - and it's bright!

By , Forbes,

New Jersey faces some tough issues. And not just being a ubiquitous punch line and those occasionally uncomfortably close-to-accurate Sopranos storylines.

By , Investor Place,

With fall setting in and the conventions over, the race to determine the president of the United States is in full swing. And weather patterns notwithstanding, it seems the amount of hot air is set to increase — a normal quadrennial occurrence as two candidates jockey for position.

CNBC Fast Money,

The bull run in the stock market is about half over, and mega-cap companies are the way to go from here, says Ken Fisher of Fisher Investments.

By , Forbes,

During elections, it’s not uncommon for presidential candidates to say they’ll “fix” the economy, and the opponent only wants to wreck it to enrich buddies, favored industries, and so on.  Which rather implies the president has much more power than he actually has.

By , Forbes,

In the second half of nearly every bull market you need only own bigger-than-average stocks to beat the market. By that, I mean market value north of $78 billion, which is the average market capitalization of stocks in the MSCI All Country World Index.

By , Interactive Investor,

The naysayers were wrong (again). US companies grew second-quarter earnings by 8.3% compared with 2011 - hugely beating expectations. From here, earnings growth is likely to decelerate - expect it, but don't fear it.

By , Investor’s Business Daily,

As the US's election draws nearer, I've seen more and more articles bemoaning the apparently unprecedented polarization of our great nation—Republicans and Democrats distrust each other like never before, Congress can't get anything done and neither Presidential candidate can seize popular momentum. And somehow, we're told, this is a worrisome development.

By , TheStreet.com,

As if it weren't hard enough to know if a politician means what he says. Now, they say what they mean.

By , Forbes,

Stocks love gridlock. Which is why election-year stock returns historically are above-average positive.

By , Forbes,

On Tuesday, Moody’s threatened to downgrade the US—if the US doesn’t plunge over the metaphorical cliff that is fiscal.

By , Forbes,

Included in the GOP 2012 platform (which, according to many politicians, no one reads) is a proposal to consider the feasibility of a “metallic basis for US currency” (read: gold standard)— music to the ears of gold standard fans.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Control is an alluring temptress. We humans are notorious for attempting to maintain control over as many aspects of our lives as possible—our weight, the number of calories we consume (or don't), the number of friends we have on social media sites, how well-regarded our Twitter feed is and so on until we're micromanaging our own selves to the point of absurdity. Being humans (their protestations to the contrary aside), politicians are equally subject to such enticements.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

You won't find it on any top-10 lists, but to me, free trade belongs with Bill Buckner and Steve Bartman as one of the greatest scapegoats in modern times. Sure, free trade agreements never robbed anyone of a World Series title, but they've been pinned for more job losses and business woes than I can count—and, likely, far more than they should be.

By , Forbes,

One year after S&P downgraded America from its sterling AAA credit rating, across the board, Treasury rates are lower. Yes, that is the opposite of what most would generally expect.

By , Interactive Investor,

US GDP grew 1.5% in the second quarter, and headlines screamed, "Too slow!" Many fear a fresh recession and bear market ahead. Nonsense - the US economy grows fine. More important, GDP isn't perfectly predictive for stocks.

By , Forbes,

The Republican National Convention starts Monday, and the Democrats follow suit next weekend—which means the campaign is officially under way.

So turn your hot-air detector on high. Here are three things both candidates will likely say (repeatedly) during this election cycle that have little grounding in reality.

By , Forbes,

As of yesterday, the S&P 500 (total return) breached its previous all-time high. Which may make this the most hated bull market of all time.

By , Real Clear Markets,

Leave it to California to get its financial scandal completely backwards.

In most places, a state funding scandal would involve money going missing. But here in my great state, alarm bells rang when officials discovered many departments had, well, too much money. An extra $2.3 billion, in fact--not exactly chump change in this cash-strapped state.

By , Forbes,

In the ongoing dust-up over the “fiscal cliff,” the Joint Committee on Taxation estimates the cost to extend the much-debated “Bush tax cuts” will be $54 billion in 2013.

By , The Street,

As PIIGS go, Spain and Italy have hogged headlines since July 26 when European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi suggested the bank may purchase Spanish and Italian debt to help ease borrowing costs.

By , InvestorPlace,

In recent weeks, there’s been an increasing din in media proclaiming stocks are either dead, dying or at least seriously infirm. Most often, the evidence provided that the end is near are comparisons of GDP growth and long-run equity market returns.

By , Forbes,

Frequently, you can hear (or read) that because stock returns have been, on average, materially higher than average US GDP growth rates, there’s a big disconnect and shouldn’t the two roughly match? Hence, doesn’t that mean a new era of long-term lousy stock returns must kick off, forthwith?

Nope.

By , Forbes,

Here is some investing advice for a world with seemingly too many whiners. First, just shut up—if you’re upset, that is. It will help. Psychologists will tell you the opposite, that talking it out helps. Not with investing. The more you talk about investing problems, the worse you feel. Instead of complaining, it’s better to do something.

By , Forbes,

n a year there’s been much jaw-wagging over whether certain people do or don’t pay their “fair share” of taxes, you’d think the CBO’s latest report on the distribution of household income and taxes would garner more prime time.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

QE3. The mere mention of these three alphanumeric characters seems to have an almost narcotic effect on investors and commentators. The US is slowing, they argue, and only the Fed's magic money can get things moving again. Quantitative easing is our economic drug, and we need more, more, more.

By , Interactive Investor,

Have you gotten big yet? Do it now - big cap growth shares will lead the rest of this bull market. And there's plenty of bull market left.

By , InvestorPlace,

Plenty of editorial space has been dedicated lately to the dearth of fiscal stimulus measures being globally employed — and the overabundance of “austerity” measures, ostensibly referring to some countries’ mix of (typically) tax increases and government spending cuts.

By , Forbes,

President Obama is taking a lot of heat for you-didn’t-build-that-gate. Campaigns are marathons—politicians are giving 3 or 4 (or more) speeches a day—and every word taped and every sentence prone to get lifted and blasted, out of context, ad nauseum in your opponent’s ads (blogs, YouTube vids, etc.).

By , Forbes,

Another day, another op-ed about how high unemployment is a hindrance to economic growth.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

One frequent quibble I have with many economic commentators is they habitually underestimate both free markets' and individuals' power to solve the seemingly unsolvable—and overestimate the government's ability to do so, sans harmful side effects or unintended consequences.

By , Forbes,

Homebuyers rejoice! The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has found a way to potentially make the mortgage application process very slightly incrementally less onerous.

By , The Street,

Slowing Chinese economic growth has been a prominent topic of concern for the better part of 2012.

By , InvestorPlace,

Evidently, France has discovered the secret to enhancing economic competitiveness: really, really high taxes!

PRWeb,

Fourth longest-running columnist in Forbes magazine’s 95-year history celebrates another year.

By , Real Clear Markets,

Herman Van Rompuyhas a vision problem. Oh, I'm sure the good man-EU poet laureate, Belgian Prime Minister and European Council President-sees just fine through his eyeballs. But the quixotic ambitions in his recent proposal for a federalist eurozone suggest his mind's eye is a touch fuzzy. He seems to think he can help create the United States of Europe. But it won't work, at least as he envisions it.

By , Bloomberg,

Ratings companies, whose scores have helped determine the cost of money for governments and businesses for more than a century, are no longer trusted by the world’s biggest investors, according to the former head of structured finance at Standard & Poor's.

By , London Evening Standard,

A former senior member of staff at credit ratings agency Standard & Poor’s has confirmed what critics have been arguing for some time: serious investors no longer believe the ratings.

By , Forbes,

In the ongoing fiscal cliff saga, additional volleys have been fired in recent days. For the uninitiated, the so-called fiscal cliff is most often referring to the confluence of sunsetting Bush-era tax rates and some automatic spending cuts tied to last year’s debt ceiling dust-up. Left alone, tax rates for all US taxpayers could move materially higher in 2013.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

Moody's recently completed a review of 17 global banks' credit ratings (a study that took four months) and "repositioned" (or in simpler vernacular, downgraded) over a dozen. Moody's cited, among other things, banks' potential future earnings volatility, increased capitalization requirements, liquidity buffers and exposure to Europe and the US housing industry.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

It is a "truth" universally acknowledged: The repeal of 1933's Glass-Steagall Act was directly responsible for the events of 2008. After all, had the Financial Services Modernization Act (FSMA) of 1999 not removed the dividing line between commercial and investment banking—had banks been properly "ringfenced," in today's vernacular—banks' balance sheets wouldn't have been overleveraged and riddled with so-called toxic assets. And the wave of failures and bailouts thus would never have crested.

PRWeb,

Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter profiles part of firm’s effort to reach British investors.

By , The Street,

With 2012 nearly half over, the following list, though not comprehensive, highlights a few questions that we believe many investors are pondering for 2012's back half.

By , Bloomberg,

“It is not clear why a bank needs to do lots of activities in financial services that aren’t banking,” Ken Fisher, CEO and founder of Woodside, California-based Fisher Investments, which manages about $44 billion, said in an interview. “It is not clear to me, other than perhaps in some very specialty cases, that being a bank helps you be an investment bank or an asset manager or an insurer.”

By , Interactive Investor,

Recent Chinese economic data has been mixed - first-quarter GDP was 8.1%, below the fourth quarter's 8.9% - and deceleration may have carried into the second quarter. June's "flash" PMI estimate - a measure of manufacturing activity - weakened to 48.1 from May's 48.4 (a molehill, not a mountain).

By , Forbes,

Good news! If you’re on vacation and get sick, you’re entitled to schedule another vacation. Less good news. To qualify, you must be employed in Europe.

By , The Street,

You may already be acquainted with Ken Fisher. He's the author of "Portfolio Strategy," a long-running column in Forbes, and he's well-known as the biggest wealth manager in the U.S.: His firm, Fisher Investments, has more than $41 billion under management. He's also got a lot of wealth in his own right; Forbes estimates his worth at $1.7 billion.

By , Bloomberg,

“Moody’s is not going to detect some problem in advance and move a rating to warn the public,” said Ken Fisher, chief executive officer and founder of Woodside, California-based Fisher Investments, which has about $44 billion under management. “Whether it’s a stock or a bond, the free market already did that. Moody’s goes along afterwards and effectively validates what the market’s already done.”

By , AdvisorOne,

Other banks challenging Moody’s include Morgan Stanley, Bank of America and Royal Bank of Scotland. Moody’s said that those three plus Citi, which were all recipients of taxpayer bailouts, have a history of “high volatility” and problems with risk management.

By , Investor's Business Daily,

At a recent White House press briefing, President Obama committed a grievous error and did the unthinkable: He doled out economic analysis and suggested that ... wait for it ... the private sector's "doing fine."

By , Forbes,

President Obama continues to get hoots and hollers over his statement the private economy is doing fine. He then later attempted to walk that statement back, which only led to speculation whether the first statement was a gaffe, not a gaffe, or a Washington gaffe (that’s when politicians inadvertently say something they mean).

By , InvestorPlace,

When China released its 12th Five-Year Plan in March 2011, one sentence raised more than a few eyebrows: “Government at all levels should create a sound policy, system and legal environment, break down market segmentation and industry monopoly, stimulate initiative and creativity of market players, steer the behavior of market players towards national strategic objectives.”

By , Investor's Business Daily,

A common investor fear thus far in 2012 has been the potential fallout from a slowing Chinese economy. And it is true China's Q1 GDP growth rate decelerated from Q4 2011—and that may have carried a bit into Q2. However, more recent numbers suggest the stimulus measures China continues to employ are having an impact.

By , Forbes,

The latest Q1 US GDP growth estimate was revised down to 1.9%. However, the headline number often obscures realities. For example, government spending was one of the larger downward revisions—falling -3.9%. Ignore that, and GDP was relatively gangbusters!

By , The Street,

Eurobonds. German Chancellor Angela Merkel hates them. French President François Hollande loves them. And a growing chorus of EU officials think they're the best bet for preserving the euro.

But are they, really?

By , The Street,

With the 2012 U.S. presidential race in full swing, rhetoric is also heating up. Rhetoric aside (which is always heated in elections -- nothing unusual about that), election years are typically good for stocks. U.S. stocks have historically done well in election years, averaging 10.9% since 1928.

By , InvestorPlace.com,

If any word in the English language seems to give Angela Merkel hives, it’s this: eurobonds.

Eurobonds, in case you’ve missed it, is the latest “big idea” in the eurozone

By , Forbes,

Perhaps part of Greece’s problem is it’s illegal to sell books after 6 PM. That’s not the only problem, but it’s possibly emblematic of deeper issues.

By , Interactive Investor,

With nearly all firms reporting, the first-quarter average US earnings growth rate is 8.0%, hugely beating 3.2% expectations. Some analysts expected contraction. As impressive, revenues grew 5% - revenues being a more direct reflection of global demand.

By , Seeking Alpha,

Since its 2008 launch, the Market Vectors Solar Energy ETF (KWT)has fallen 94% from a peak of $43.93/share to roughly $2.50/share currently.

By , Forbes,

This year, ignore political babble. You’ll be better off. Ignore debt debates, silly fake controversies and finger pointing over who is or isn’t the bigger fan of private enterprise. (I win that footrace, anyway.)

By , Real Clear Markets,

It's popular among politicians, particularly in an election year, to bemoan the death of various aspects of American life-whether cultural, political or economic-because it allows incumbents and candidates alike to proclaim how they'll save the day.

By , InvestorPlace,

With earnings season effectively over (474 firms have reported), S&P 500 profit growth averaged 8% — soundly beating consensus estimates of 3.2% — and marking the 11th consecutive quarter of earnings growth.

By , Yahoo,

This week, in comments reported by China's Xinhua news agency, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao hinted at the government's economic strategy, saying China should "properly handle the relationship between maintaining stable and relatively fast growth, adjusting the economic structure and managing inflationary expectations.

Bloomberg,

Ken Fisher, chairman and chief executive officer of Fisher Investments, discusses the decline in shares of Facebook, Inc. after its initial public offering. Fisher talked to Bloomberg's Kathleen Hays and Vonnie Quinn on "The Hays Advantage" on Bloomberg Radio on May 22, 2012.

By , Forbes,

Whether Facebook quadrupled or cratered, it’s been trading for 2 days and some change (as I write). Nothing about nothing over 2.17 days tells you anything about anything. Its falling price isn’t even that unusual for über-fresh IPOs, which tend to lose money on average in their first few trading sessions.

By , Forbes,

I know it may seem passé in the age of iPads, eReaders and Kindles, but one of my passions is collecting books, especially investment classics. I didn’t know it at the time, but the first classic I read was in 1959 when I was 8 years old. It was my father Phil Fisher’s New York Times Best Seller Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits. I complained about it cutting into my summer vacation and didn’t really understand it, but it probably sparked my love for investing books.

By , Forbes,

For all of California’s effort to close their funding gap, it seems California’s budget deficit is now $16 billion. For those doing the math, that’s $7 billion more than the most recent $9 billion projection. Contributing to the wider gap were tax receipts coming in about $4 billion below projections.

By , The Street,

When April's U.S. unemployment came out, one headline perfectly captured the news and popular reaction: "Unemployment Rate Hits Three-Year Low. Hooray? No, Boo!" Headline unemployment fell to 8.1%, but payroll gains slowed and missed expectations, fueling fears of weaker employment growth from here.

By , Reuters,

Elections in Greece and France over the weekend have ushered in a new period of uncertainty for financial markets that could stand in the way of the easy-money rally that boosted stocks at the start of the year.

By , Reuters UK,

Elections in Greece and France over the weekend have ushered in a new period of uncertainty for financial markets that could stand in the way of the easy-money rally that boosted stocks at the start of the year.

By , iStockAnalyst,

US and global corporate earnings have grown for nine straight quarters—nearly all big, double-digit quarterly growth. Revenue, a more direct reflection of the growing global economy, has also grown consistently of late. But now, consensus expectations are full-year 2012 earnings growth will be slower than 2011's 15%.

By , Real Clear Markets,

There's been much discussion lately of America's impending "fiscal cliff." And some have recently bandied about the term "taxmageddon" to describe the likely scenario if politicians don't take certain actions by the year's end.

By , Interactive Investor,

The race is on - Mitt Romney is now the presumed Republican candidate, so the mud slinging can really begin. But investors should ignore heated political rhetoric (whether in the US, UK or elsewhere). Politicians rarely do what they say they will - especially Presidents. And whether Obama or Romney wins, stocks look likely to rise big in 2012.

By , MSN,

It's simple to understand, and has a nice ring to it. It's made some investors look like geniuses recently. Say it enough and you might even believe it.

Too bad "Sell in May and go away" doesn't work.

By , The Street,

For decades, many U.S. investors have feared the decline of American manufacturing. Some point to manufacturing's falling share of the economy, others to the loss of U.S. manufacturing jobs. However, a close look at global data shows America remains a manufacturing powerhouse and leads a worldwide wave of productivity gains.

By , Forbes,

San Francisco has decided to get patriotic.

BART, the Bay Area’s public rail line, will replace 775 trains in its aging fleet, giving preference to vendors who build the trains in America. The idea is to help create American jobs—a lofty goal.

By , Forbes,

Most readers know that I am an ardent student of market history and a firm believer that it’s prone to repeating itself. So I’m often asked what the current era echoes. My answer: the early 1990s.

By , Forbes,

The heretofore undefined “Buffett rule” got a bit less murky recently, as the senate introduced the “Paying a Fair Share Act of 2012" in March and the president commented on the proposal yesterday.

By , Forbes,

America’s least corrupt state is . . . New Jersey.

That’s not a punchline.

The Center for Public Integrity recently released its State Integrity Investigation, aimed at measuring state corruption. In their words “The Investigation is not simply a tally of scandals that have occurred in state governments.” Fair enough, except they don’t really define what “corruption” means.

By , Interactive Investor,

Stocks are having a fine year - global stocks in pounds are up nearly 10% in the first quarter. Yet, instead of cheering, folks are gloomy - a positive factor that will boost stocks higher still in 2012.

By , The Street,

It's an election year, which means we should all expect plenty of tax policy, debt and deficit rhetoric. And rhetoric can get heated -- but before getting swept away, here are some important factors to keep in mind.

By , Interactive Investor,

Stocks are having a fine year - global stocks in pounds are up nearly 10% in the first quarter. Yet, instead of cheering, folks are gloomy - a positive factor that will boost stocks higher still in 2012.

By , Bloomberg Businessweek,

Fisher Investments in November opened a campus near the city’s lesser-known namesake, Vancouver, Washington. Residents of the town of about 161,800 enjoy the double benefit of no state income tax in Washington while living close to sales-tax free Oregon.

Ken Fisher, chairman and chief executive officer of Fisher Investments, says "we are clearly in a bull market" that will last another two years. Fisher talks with Bloomberg's Ken Prewitt and Tom Keene on Bloomberg Radio's "Bloomberg Surveillance."

Bloomerg Businessweek, 3/29/2012

Former Camas, Washington, Mayor Paul Dennis talks about the impact of state tax policies on the area's workforce and economy. Fisher Investments Inc. and other employers have expanded in the area, where residents pay no Washington income tax while living close to sales tax-free Oregon.

By , iStockAnalyst,

Ah, the partisan electricity of an election year! The hot-gas-bag-bluster pollutes our media-saturated senses all year round. It's a blessed thing for the stock market, and in a variety of ways. Call me non-civic, but investors shouldn't care a wit who wins the White House this year.

By , Forbes,

Is happiness more important than economic growth?

Many argue GDP is a faulty economic measure. I have my own quibbles with GDP. While the top-line number isn’t a perfect indicator of economic health, the underlying data is instructive, and it does allow for more of an apples-to-apples comparison across nations.

By , iStockAnalyst,

Since the peripheral eurozone's debt troubles seized the spotlight in 2010, one fear has repeatedly cropped up: Contagion. Folks worried a Greek default would trigger credit default swaps (CDS), setting off a chain reaction of bank failures across the Continent. However, reality has thus far proved far more benign.

By , Forbes,

For the first time in 26 years, I opened my eyes this morning and could see—thanks to capitalism.

By , Forbes,

Last year was a dismal year for Chinese stocks. The popular FTSE/Xinhua China 25 Index of blue chips fell nearly 18%. This year it has already gained 7.9%, and I think Chinese stocks will shine in 2012.

By , Forbes,

Happy birthday to the bull market, which turned three March 9. It’s been far from smooth sailing (what bull market is?) as the bull has contended near constantly with greatly exaggerated rumors of its death at the hands of some tiny European nations’ debt loads, “too-high” unemployment, a US double-dip (that never happened), contentious politics, etc.

By , Interactive Investor,

In my view, shares boom huge in 2012 as the world overall grows nicely in the aftermath of 2011's paranoia - but the eurozone is a weak spot and may already be in recession.

By , The Street,

Chinese officials caused quite a stir when they lowered their 2012 economic growth target to 7.5%. Many already fretted a Chinese hard landing in 2012, and if Chinese growth were indeed to match the target, it would be the slowest expansion since 1990. However, recent history suggests Chinese growth should exceed those low expectations.

By , Forbes,

Long-term forecasts are rarely sunny or even middling. In fact, they’re often fairly dystopian: Peak oil, peak gas, peak water, peak food, mass hysteria, zombie apocalypse.

By , iStockAnalyst,

With aggregate eurozone GDP contracting in Q4 2011 and the European Commission forecasting a Continental recession in 2012, investors may wonder what a eurozone recession means for the global economy and equity markets.

By , The Street,

In our view, the bull market likely continues with gusto throughout 2012, with strongly positive equity returns. Sentiment remains dour -- investors continue to fear an imminent eurozone collapse, too much debt, a deteriorating U.S. economy, political turmoil, etc.

By , Forbes,

Q4 2011 GDP growth was revised up to 3% from 2.8%. Which is nice, but backward looking. GDP calculations are inherently a bit wonky and a few basis-point revisions don’t matter much, particularly since GDP can be and frequently is revised significantly, even many years later.

By , Forbes,

You may remember that in my February column last year I predicted that 2011 would “frustrate bulls and bears alike—without a big directional trend” and “end up or down just by a hair.” I was right, but my stock picking could have been better.

By , Forbes,

It seems the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) believes a good way to protect you would be curtailing the practice of banks discretely covering your checks, instantaneously, should you overdraft.

By , The Street,

In our view, stock returns are strongly positive in 2012 and the world overall grows, even though the eurozone is likely a weak spot and may even go into recession in aggregate.

By , Forbes,

With Ron Paul still in the running for president, it’s become popular (again) to call for a return to the gold standard.

By , iStockAnalyst,

2011 was by nearly any count a volatile year chock full of news—the majority tied to the eurozone, specifically the countries known as the PIIGS (Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain).

By , Interactive Investor,

Headlines warn of a Chinese "hard landing". Don't buy it. China has every incentive to stoke growth in 2012 - which should boost Chinese stocks nicely.

By , Forbes,

Come April or May (ish?) Facebook plans to join the ranks of Tech IPOs, probably aiming to be more like Google and less like Pets.com. Though who knows?

By , The Street,

Three years into the eurozone's peripheral debt saga, a ton of political and financial capital has been spent, the euro hasn't suddenly shattered and a eurozone-born financial panic hasn't erupted.

PRWeb,

Ken Fisher and his firm’s Investment Policy Committee detail their market and macroeconomic forecast for the year ahead.

The Wall Street Journal,

Best-Selling Books Week Ended Jan. 29

By , Forbes,

Folks often talk as if gridlock is a bad thing. Then, there’s House Resolution 29, which would immediately withdraw the US from NAFTA.

PRWeb,

New educational video answers common questions about the US’s outstanding debt

By , Forbes,

It’s an election year! At this stage, it’s impossible to handicap who wins. But one thing’s certain: Expect all candidates to keep repeating the tired “US manufacturing is dying” bromide.

By , iStockAnalyst,

As the US debt ceiling closes in on its 105th increase in 94 years, investors' concerns over the US's debt load are returning to the fore. But are these concerns well-founded? The answers to these three common questions may provide surprising insight.

By , Forbes,

Where are all the “January effect” headlines?

You know—all the “so goes January goes the year” stories”? Sometimes folks just focus on the first five days: “So goes the first five days goes the month goes the year.” Because if you believed in this “effect” you ought to be bullish. Which is perhaps why, in general, those who believe most in this myth are whistling and looking a different direction.

By , Interactive Investor,

As 2011 began, I predicted stocks likely to be choppy but flat - just what happened in 2011. Now, I'm super bullish for 2012 - stocks should be up big, much bigger than most can fathom. Folks are too dour and can't see how strong fundamentals are globally. What's more, everyone expects Italy to be a disaster - it won't be.

PRWeb,

New research graphic answers three key questions about America’s debt.

By , Forbes,

Did you know the US is about to raise the debt ceiling? For the 105th time?

Seems odd another increase is quietly pending since the penultimate increase (that’s right, there was one after that) in August last was preceded by a solid two months of political histrionics, name-calling and hyperbole. Then S&P downgraded the US!

By , Reuters,

Investors are about to find out if the economic woes in Europe are going to deliver a deep wound to U.S. company earnings instead of the mere scratch that many expect.

Mindful Money,

This time of year, there are a lot of expert opinions around: the top funds for 2012; the performance of the FTSE 100; the high-flying sectors and stocks for the year ahead. Most of these experts appear credible and well-qualified and make a sound argument for their predictions. The trouble is, many are wrong much of the time, particularly in a climate where stock market performance is dominated by political events.

By , Reuters,

With the new year comes a new round of bold predictions for financial markets.

Investing 101: The Consumer Price Index

By , Forbes,

I’m recently back from three weeks traveling in Europe. The trip has given me better perspective on the market’s current obsession—the troubled euro zone. To put it bluntly, I say, give ’em the finger—the Italian Finger, that is.

By , Reuters,

For the U.S. stock market, 2011 was a long wild ride to nowhere.

The broad S&P 500 endured huge daily swings but a year of drama left the index almost where it started. It lost a mere 0.003 percent, closest to unchanged since 1947, according to Standard & Poor's.

By , Forbes,

By no mean exhaustive, but here’s a wrap-up of some of the bigger news stories in 2011.

By , Real Clear Markets,

Is fracking environmentally safe? That's a key question surrounding the fast-growing method of gas and oil extraction-and one that's triggered debate since the process became more economically viable.

By , The Motley Fool,

Wouldn't it be nice to see some optimism amid all fear and gloom in the financial press at the moment? Well, renowned investor Ken Fisher is the man to provide it; he's recently given us four reasons why the economy is set to rebound, and highlighted some shares that he expects to benefit.

By , Forbes,

Here’s something that didn’t happen this year—a US double dip. (Nor was there a global one.)  However, some warn we’re not out of the woods: We could see a double-dip second leg in 2013.

By , iStockAnalyst,

While many seem focused on what is widely thought a beleaguered American shopper, US consumers, overall, are seemingly doing just fine. For example, continued improvements in household credit trends, highlight how US consumers aren't down for the count. What's more, holiday spending patterns are a great example of how bad consumer spending isn't.

By , The Street,

Is fracking environmentally safe? That's a key question surrounding the fast-growing method of gas and oil extraction -- and one that's triggered debate since the process became more economically viable.

By , Forbes,

I recently returned from FORBES’ “Cruise for ­Investors,” with ports of call in Greece, Israel, Cyprus and Turkey. Even more intriguing than the places we visited was the feedback I got from the 96 cruisers attending. Most of these folks are affluent, postretirement and either married or widowed. They can afford the finer things in life and have a good deal of free time on their hands. All were loyal FORBES readers, real Capitalist Tools.

PRWEB,

Ken Fisher’s latest investment book, Markets Never Forget (Wiley, 11/08/11) has spent the past three weeks climbing the Wall Street Journal’s Hardcover Business Best Seller list. Debuting at #9 in the week ending November 20, the book moved to #8 the following week and finished the week ending December 4 at #6.

PRWeb,

Markets Never Forget is among the top-selling business hardcovers for the third straight week.

By , The Street,

China's slower economic growth is just one of many things weighing on investors' minds in 2011, and some posit a Chinese hard landing is in store in 2012. However, our analysis finds a re-acceleration far likelier.

By , Forbes,

Good news, Maryland. Or rather, good news, Maryland?

The state has decided to focus effort (and money) on helping fund Maryland-based start-up firms. Now, the intention is likely to increase the tax base by goading new business development. And the jobs that come with it! A laudable goal, to be sure. But one might ask, who will determine where to invest capital to get the best ROI in an inherently risky venture (as all new businesses are)? The government? (Ahem, Solyndra.)

By , Interactive Investor,

Need more evidence the world is nowhere near as troubled as most think? Look at iron ore prices.

Maybe you've never, ever thought of iron ore prices. And why would you? An unsexy bulk commodity and chief input to steel-making blast furnaces. Except iron ore prices portend a lot about the economy - chiefly that the US likely isn't going into recession soon. I'll show you how and why. With the overall world growing, and emerging markets faster, there's little chance of a global recession in 2012.

By , Real Clear Markets,

What a difference two and a half years make: In May 2009, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh won a landslide reelection on his platform of economic reform, and high hopes drove India's stock market up a whopping 20% the next day. But aside from free trade agreements with South Korea and ASEAN, progress has been limited.

PRWeb,

Research shows economic growth creates new jobs, not the other way around.

By , The Street,

Last week's unemployment rate drop gave the economy's bulls and bears alike something to cheer. The bulls pointed to the drop as a clear sign of broad employment improvement. The bears pointed to it as a sign of the still-all-too-high unemployment rate that could tip us into the next recession. But neither analysis is really right.

The Street, 12/08/2011

Ken Fisher, author of Markets Never Forget But People Do, offers his top stock picks for 2012.

By , Forbes,

‘Tis the season to be retrospective—a time to ponder the good things in life, or at least, the things that didn’t go as horribly as feared.

Bloomberg Radio,

Ken Fisher, chairman and chief executive officer of Fisher Investments, says the Greek economy "is toast". Fisher discusses his book, "Markets Never Forget But People Do: How Your Memory Is Costing You Money and Why This Time Isn't Different". He speaks with Kathleen Hays on "The Hays Advantage" on Bloomberg Radio.

Reuters,

Ameriprise Financial Chief Market Strategist David Joy and Fisher Investments' Ken Fisher discuss global market outlook and how the euro zone debt crisis will affect economic growth.

By , Reuters,

Billionaire investor Ken Fisher, who last February had turned neutral on stocks, said on Monday he has become very bullish and finds most equity markets attractive.

Reuters,

Fisher, a long-time Forbes columnist and author of several books on the markets, is particularly bullish, saying he does not expect either Europe or the United States to slip into recession in 2012. Fisher said he prefers European leaders do nothing to deal with the sovereign debt crisis in Italy and Spain because he fears anything they agree to would only make things worse.

By , Reuters,

The United States faces only limited fallout from the euro zone debt crisis and the struggling European economy, a situation that bodes well for U.S. equity markets in 2012, top U.S. money managers said on Monday.

By , Research Magazine,

Our expert panel sees turbulence — and opportunity — in the year ahead.

PRWeb,

Fisher Investments launched a new blog, Global Market Perspective, offering a look at what’s going on outside the US. The blog covers economic and market-related events, including geopolitical developments and international commerce, as well as interesting topics that can help investors learn about global capital markets.

PRWeb,

New blog offers perspectives on market-related topics and news outside the US

By , Forbes,

It seems November was a good month for private sector job creation—with 206,000 jobs added when only 130,000 were expected. Add that to revised numbers in October and September—October saw 130,000 added instead of the previously reported 110,000, and September jumped to 116,000 from 91,000. What’s more, small firms added the lion’s share, and even the construction industry saw some job gains.

By , The Street,

The European Union has unveiled its much-discussed credit ratings agency reform plan. This comes on the heels of a blunder wherein a major agency accidentally sent an email announcing a downgrade to France's credit rating. (Similarly, the same rater made a $2 trillion math error when assessing the U.S.'s credit worthiness in August.)

The Wall Street Journal,

Best-Selling Books Week Ended Nov. 20

By , Real Clear Markets,

Pretty much everything I read these days suggests much the same: "As the euro goes, so goes the world." I'm not so sure. Particularly for stock investors, maybe the euro and its zone are headed for more trouble, but the world can move on. Unfathomable?

By , Forbes,

The “umbrella man” is that curious fellow standing by the side of the road at the spot where bullets entered JFK’s convertible in Dallas. A beautiful sunny day—and there’s a fellow standing under an opened black umbrella.

By , Interactive Investor,

Stocks globally have been hugely volatile. What now? Forget what stocks did yesterday, last week, last month, last year. None of it matters for where stocks go next. And now is a great time to be bullish.

By , Forbes,

In this space, I often say that high unemployment is a symptom of past economic weakness, not a harbinger of future weakness. This may seem counterintuitive, but isn’t.

PRWeb,

Historical data shows unemployment rises even after recessions end.

By , Forbes,

In a new twist on the “income inequality” debate, evidently, older people earn more than younger people. The reason why this tautology is news now is because, according to the Pew Center, the gap is wider than ever.

BusinessWire,

Four-time New York Times bestselling author, 27-year Forbes columnist, and Fisher Investments CEO Ken Fisher released his eighth book, co-authored by Lara Hoffmans: Markets Never Forget (But People Do): How Your Memory Is Costing You Money—and Why This Time Isn't Different (Wiley; November 2011; Hardcover and e-Book).

By , PRWeb,

Fisher Investments released its latest Stock Market Outlook, a quarterly research report published by the firm’s in-house research team under the direction of the Investment Policy Committee.

PRWeb,

New research report recaps recent market activity and provides forecast for period ahead.

By , The Street,

Third-quarter earnings season is in full swing, with 315 S&P 500 firms reporting through Oct. 28, with enough data, in our view, to get a decent picture of what the full quarter may look like.

By , USA Today,

Partisan politicians. Divisive politics. Fights about economic policies. Financial markets have been battling political headwinds ever since Republicans won control of the House of Representatives in last year's midterm elections.

By , Forbes,

Today’s biggest investor fear boils down to one thing: recession. While there’s no guarantee that there won’t be a double dip, I can tell you with certainty that another recession now would be unprecedented when you consider the historical evidence.

By , The Street,

Economists, both Keynesian and other in bent, have at least one area of commonality: The belief there's an aspect of economics that numerical studies or analysis of plans and policies can't explain. It's the behavioral aspect that drives consumers to spend and businesses to take risk: in Keynesian lingo, "animal spirits." In classical econo-speak, "confidence."

By , Forbes,

You’d think after 200 years, folks would eventually say, “That Malthus guy? Kind of wrong.” Yet, with the (projected) birth today of the world’s 7 billionth occupant, there’s no shortage of media hand-wringing about the dim prospects of our world from here.

By , Forbes,

Q3 US GDP growth came in at 2.5%—in line with analyst estimates but certainly much faster than what media headlines predicted. All year, folks have feared a recession ahead—the so-called “double dip” (which are predicted vastly more than they’re ever seen). GDP is the big headline grabber—but it’s far from the only sign the world is not only healthier than most think, but in fact reaccelerating.

By , USA Today,

Stocks around the world shot up sharply Thursday as investors went on a risk-taking binge after Europe finally sealed a long-awaited deal to stem its debt crisis.

By , Forbes,

Back in January, President Obama suggested all existing federal legislation be reviewed to slash “overly burdensome” regulation. Who can argue with that? Simplifying existing rules would, theoretically, save costs while making existing regulations clearer and more effective. All good things.

By , Forbes,

The political geniuses in Louisiana have decided they hate poor people so much, they passed House Bill 195—near unanimously—which bans cash on all second-hand transactions.

By , The Street,

It's no secret that economic sentiment is low. Consumer and business confidence surveys have deteriorated worldwide for months. Headlines bemoan an economy on the brink, and some say recession is here already. Yet simultaneously, the balance of economic data has consistently outstripped expectations, registered continued growth and painted a vastly different picture than many might think.

By , Forbes,

The fall of 2011 feels a lot like the same time of 2010 – just a month later in the year. We had a double bottom this year with a major market correction that challenged the size of what might be considered a bear market. The same thing happened in 2010.

By , Interactive Investor,

GDP growth rates are imperfect, backward-looking snapshots of the past, although they can be useful - to a degree. But bet against anyone getting excited by them, says Ken Fisher.

By , Interactive Investor,

Next year Americans will either re-elect a Democrat or newly elect a Republican. Forget which party you favour - this is a sweet-spot intersection of markets and politics regardless of who wins, says Ken Fisher.

By , Forbes,

The fall of 2011 feels a lot like the same time of 2010 – just a month later in the year. We had a double bottom this year with a major market correction that challenged the size of what might be considered a bear market. The same thing happened in 2010.

PRWeb,

Recent data suggests the US economy remains stronger than many believe.

By , Forbes,

This may be unpopular to say, but the US likely isn’t headed for recession. At least, that’s what the data suggests.

By , Forbes,

This is simply a lighthearted blog on politics and isn’t even closely related to the normal serious content of my print magazine Forbes columns. And it’s about an upcoming bomb and one that few foresee but is ever predictable. And it’s ridiculous but very real! And because of it, Herman Cain may be the one who bombs. It could alternately be titled, “Bill Clinton Lesson 274” because there are so many almost ridiculous but useful lessons from his era.

By , The Street,

As of the market close on Oct. 12, that's the reduction in the 30-year Treasury rate since Sept. 20, the day preceding the Fed's declaration that it would sell $400 billion of short-term Treasuries and buy $400 billion of long-term Treasuries.

By , Forbes,

A core issue in the debate over the Currency Exchange Rate Oversight Reform Act of 2011 is the idea China’s currency manipulation is sapping the US of jobs—primarily manufacturing jobs.

By , Forbes,

With Rick Perry and the seven dwarfs scrambling for the nomination, there is good news and bad news for investors aligned with the Republican Party.

By , Forbes,

Steve Jobs while he lived was occasionally criticized for not being more charitable—like his compatriot and competitor Bill Gates or Warren Buffett. Hogwash.

By , The Street,

Since the Senate began debating legislation to impose new import duties on Chinese goods on Monday, much has been made of the possibility of resurgent protectionism in the U.S.

By , Forbes,

Almost every day you can find in media commentary that XYZ is causing stocks to fall (or rise). Such definitive statements are common—but what’s almost always missing is statistical proof. And if you cannot prove, statistically, two things are linked, you don’t have much basis for believing Event X causes Outcome Y . . . and shouldn’t make market bets based on them.

By , The Street,

There's been increasing investor concern over the potential for Italy to follow in Greece's footsteps, an overwrought comparison in our view. Italy is the eurozone's third largest economy and carries its largest debt load -- which many speculate makes it "too big to bail out."

PRWeb,

Corporate recruiters from Woodside-based money manager will attend four career fairs/expos next week.

By , Real Clear Markets,

The U.S. Census Bureau recently released data indicating 15.1% of Americans were living below the poverty line in 2010 - the third consecutive annual increase and up from 12.5% in 2007, before the financial panic and recession. Also making recent headlines was President Obama's latest jobs plan, to be funded primarily by $1.5 trillion in increased taxes, aimed mostly at the "wealthy."

By , Forbes,

In Obama’s jobs plan (which Democrats don’t appear to be in a big rush to pass), the much-maligned credit ratings agencies appear to be getting a boost. The plan dictates that to qualify for funds from a proposed “infrastructure bank,” a project must have an investment-grade rating from a ratings agency (i.e., S&P, Moody’s or Fitch).

By , The Street,

There are two sides to every loan: a borrower and a lender. Simplistic, we know, but it seems a fact often omitted in coverage of bank lending today.

By , Forbes,

Charlie Sheen’s recent Hollywood rehabilitation is beyond record-making, both in speed and the depths from which he’s emerged. He went from making $2 million an episode in a top-rated sitcom, to being a tiger-blood infused warlock who was “WINNING!” to looking dapper and making self-deprecating jokes on Leno—like how he made nothing off those ubiquitous “Winning” t-shirts. In just a few short months!

By , Forbes,

Mr. Obama recently revealed his plan to reduce the budget deficit by $3 trillion over the next ten years. It won't work. Not because his plan is credible or not or the political climate. Rather, because 10-year projections of any sort are impossible to make. Particularly in politics.

GlobeNewswire,

Fisher Creek Campus Earns Top Projects Designation by Vancouver Business Journal.

Marketwire,

Investment Firm Will Participate in Upcoming Campus Recruiting Event at Brigham Young University.

By , Forbes,

Unless Mitt Romney can legitimately sell himself as a die-hard Lynyrd Skynyrd fan, Rick Perry is likely the 2012 Republican nominee, in my view.

By , Forbes,

In the current jobs debate, a key factor almost never mentioned is employment has always been a lagging indicator following every recession. Unemployment normally rises after recessions end and can stay elevated for many months even years.

By , The Street,

International trade is an important and volatile component of global economic growth, one that's commonly misunderstood. For example, last Thursday's U.S. Commerce Department report on trade led off with a discussion of a $6.8 billion reduction in our trade deficit, to a minus $44.8 billion.

24-7 PressRelease,

New research brief from Fisher Investments offers insight to pharmaceutical stocks drivers. 

PR.com,

Woodside-based money management firm initiates campus recruiting at UC Berkeley.

Marketwire,

Latest Release From Fisher Investments Press Offers a How-to Guide for Investing in the Telecom Sector.

PRWeb,

Video examines historical stock market performance in presidential election years.

By , Real Clear Markets,

Seems everyone these days has a suggestion for "fixing the jobs problem." Which we'd agree is improving slower than most would like.

By , The Street,

Even during the most robust economic expansions on record, economic data often gyrate -- speeding and slowing.

By , Forbes,

To add insult to injury, after filing bankruptcy last week—without returning a dime of the $535 million the taxpayers lent them—Solyndra’s skeleton crew was met on Thursday morning by FBI agents bearing search warrants.

By , Forbes,

This year is beginning to feel a lot like 2010. Last year we suffered a 16% correction in the MSCI World Index before stocks rebounded for a total return of nearly 12% in 2010.

PRLog,

Fisher Investments released a new research paper on the current state of European banks. The report provides an in-depth analysis of the financial health of European banking institutions and discusses their potential impact on the global economy.

The Columbian,

Company builds there, but will that be the firm's world base?

PressReleasePoint,

Fisher Investments is preparing for the upcoming campus recruiting season by planning visits to nearly a dozen West Coast schools, ranging from the Pacific Northwest down through Southern California.

24-7 Press Release,

Fisher Investments released a new research alert on next year's presidential election entitled, Looking Ahead to the 2012 Election. The alert provides non-ideological political commentary, with the goal of discussing the main factors influencing the election, and how the outcome may impact investors.

PR.com,

Fisher Investments is planning to release its latest Capital Markets Update video—a roundtable discussion with the five members of the firm's Investment Policy Committee (IPC)—outlining their forecast for the balance of 2011 and the underlying reasons.

By , The Street,

It's easy to find news and commentary bemoaning the U.S.'s lackluster rate of GDP growth -- particularly after last Friday's second-quarter 2011 growth revision to 1%.

By , Forbes,

August's Conference Board consumer confidence index showed consumers decidedly unconfident—the index fell to its lowest level since April 2009 and down sharply from July.

Marketwire,

Bestselling Author Shows How Market History Can Be a Critical Tool to Make Better Investing Decisions.

By , Forbes,

Mr. Bernanke emerged from Jackson Hole to declare politicians are unruly and can't agree. (Shocking no one.)

SFGate,

Fisher Investments published a new infographic summarizing market trends in presidential election years.

PRWeb,

Firm presents new research examining historical stock market performance in election years.

Forbes,

"My advice to Mr. Buffett is to stick to what he does best. If you took a vote of The Forbes 400 I am pretty sure they'd say no to raising taxes on cap gains."

By , Forbes,

Bethenny Frankel took home an estimated $55 million in 2010 for selling a chunk of her Skinnygirl brand—plus her books, TV shows, appearances and a memorable incident with a champagne bucket.

By , The Street,

An important point right up front: By no means are we making a directional call on gold. It may go higher yet, it may not.

By , Interactive Investor,

One thing we can all agree on: Shares have been volatile lately. So now what?

By , Forbes,

Staying on-phase in markets is impossible for most folks most of the time--because they make it too complicated. What do I mean by "on-phase"? Being in synch with the market cycles

CNBC,

Ken Fisher interview with Maria Bartiromo (CNBC) and Eric Marshall. Commentary is regarding correction vs. recession.

The Telegraph,

One of the world's biggest independent investment advisers, managing more than £22bn for 20,000 clients, claims share prices will bounce back next year because of rising corporate profits and the American electoral cycle.

The Guardian,

Hidden fees and high risk mean fixed-term accounts linked to the stock market are not as safe as they may seem.

Reuters,

Presidential hopeful Rick Perry's brash appeal to the Republican Party's fiscally conservative base may fall flat with big donors who favor a more moderate candidate to challenge President Barack Obama in the 2012 election.

By , Forbes,

Seems everyone is having fun piling on (or defending) the Sage of Omaha for his recent (re)assertion he isn't taxed enough—his secretary pays a higher rate!

Reuters,

For presidential hopefuls in a campaign that is all about the U.S. economy, the Republican contenders have offered few clear plans for what they would do to get the country's finances back on track.

By , The Street,

Comparing current volatility to that in 2008 seems a popular exercise recently -- but there are many notable differences.

By , Real Clear Markets,

Now that the debt ceiling debate's been settled, a 12-member congressional commission will scrutinize where and how taxpayer dollars are spent.

By , Forbes,

A 20-year prediction: Many think 2010 and 2011 presage the end of the eurozone as we know it. Could be.

By , The Street,

In recent weeks, it's easy to find a lot to be frustrated about regarding markets.

Bloomberg,

Bill Gross was right after all, though that hasn't helped his investors this year.

By , Forbes,

Much has been made of S&P's $2 trillion "math error." Funny indeed. Except the error was based on government baseline growth and spending estimates, which are rarely, ahem, accurate.

Forbes,

The recession proved to be grueling for most businesses, but the financial services industry took an especially brutal hit. Massive layoffs, government bailouts, negative headlines and countless scandals damaged the public's perception of some of the biggest finance firms.

CNBC, 07/20/2011

Can the positive earnings boost investor confidence and get the rally going again? Insight with Fisher Investments CEO, Ken Fisher.

Ken Fisher, CEO of Fisher Investments and 27-year Forbes columnist, recently announced an upcoming new book due November 2011 from John Wiley and Sons: Markets Never Forget (But People Do): How Your Memory Costs You--and Why This Time Isn't Different

GlobeNewswire,

Ken Fisher, CEO of Fisher Investments and 27-year Forbes columnist, recently announced an upcoming new book due November 2011 from John Wiley and Sons: Markets Never Forget (But People Do): How Your Memory Costs You—and Why This Time Isn't Different.

iStockAnalyst,

Italy took a step forward Thursday, as its Senate passed a €40 billion austerity bill with a 26-vote margin. The bill hits parliament's lower house Friday, and with all sides vocally unified on austerity it seems likely to pass.

By , Forbes,

As bull markets pick up steam many investors fall prey to what I call the "morphing fear phenomenon." It's a subset of the legendary "wall of worry" that bull markets love to climb. In any bear market something frightens us-- whether justified or not--and recessions always do. Early in the subsequent bull market and expansion we keep expecting these worries to appear. If they don't, we morph fresh scary fantasies that seem like new problems but are simply manifestations of old fears.

By , Real Clear Markets,

High unemployment remains a major headline grabber-with the implication that ongoing high unemployment (which even ticked up with the last BLS release) is a material economic negative.

iStockAnalyst,

Misperceptions about global trade and currency prices abound—yet another recent example surrounds China's artificially low-priced yuan and corresponding large trade surplus.

PRWeb,

Fisher Investments’ books are becoming available in various e-reader formats.

PRWeb,

Fisher Investments’ books are becoming available in various e-reader formats.

SFGate,

Books from Fisher Investments Press, a publishing imprint from Fisher Investments and John Wiley & Sons, Inc., are now available through Apple's iTunes store.

Yahoo,

Retail Sales Trounced Expectations in June--Even Though Consumers Said They'd Spend Less

BusinessWire,

Fisher Investments plans to maintain hiring as the firm experiences continued growth. Opportunities are available in its Washington and California offices.

By , Real Clear Markets,

With most new technologies, especially energy sources, comes debate between those excited by the potential and those fearful of possibly harmful ramifications or overstatement of the future scale. In our perusal of recent major news publications, Fisher Investments MarketMinder sees a timely example in the debate between major news publications surrounding shale gas extraction.

BusinessWire,

Fisher Investments, a leading, independent investment management company, recently announced it is nearing completion of the first phase of a new office complex located in Camas, Washington.

Morningstar,

Ross Stores' ROST third-quarter earnings were in line with our expectations and we are sticking with our fair value estimate of $26 a share.

iStockAnalyst,

The US and Mexican governments reached an agreement Wednesday to lift tariffs and a ban against Mexican truck deliveries in the US—Fisher Investments believes this is another win for free trade and both countries.

Reuters,

On July 16, Forbes magazine's Portfolio Strategy columnist Ken Fisher will mark his 27th year writing his column.

Marketwire,

Tomorrow Fisher Investments will release an executive summary preview of its upcoming Third Quarter 2011 Stock Market Outlook, which the firm regularly publishes for investors interested in learning about its most recent market views.

By , Interactive Investor,

Now, like last summer, media headlines cry, "Double-dip!". Of course, last year, no such double-dip appeared - not globally or in America where the fear was greatest. And, like last year, double-dip fears are likely vastly overblown. Growth metrics - in some places - have slowed some. But slow growth is still growth - and growth has always been volatile.

Bloomberg, 06/23/2011

Kenneth Fisher, chief executive officer of Fisher Investments, talks about investment strategy, the U.S. economy and growth in emerging markets. Fisher speaks with Tom Keene on Bloomberg Television's "Surveillance Midday."

Business Insider,

Investment manager and columnist Ken Fisher lampoons these and dozens of other myths in a new book, Debunkery: Learn It, Do It and Profit from It - Seeing Through Wall Street's Money-Killing Myths.

Scoop Independent News,

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke provided investors with little incentive to commit fresh funds on Wall Street as the central bank cut its economic growth forecast for 2011.

Reuters,

Volatility in equity markets is creating opportunities for investors to position themselves for a resumption of the bull market next year, according to billionaire investor Ken Fisher.

By , Interactive Investor,

Near my California hometown, an Oakland-based preacher predicted the world would end come 21 May. In case you hadn't noticed, it didn't happen (surprising no one - maybe not even the preacher). If we get past the Mayans' best guess (December 2012) we're home free. But if you knew with 100% certainty a giant asteroid would obliterate earth in 2020 - stocks wouldn't care.

Camas-Washougal Post-Record,

Fisher Investments is taking steps to move forward on construction of two additional buildings on its Fisher Creek Campus in northwest Camas.

The Columbian,

Founder of assets management company says Moore's Law continues to foster growth for firms

OregonLive.com,

Judging by the questions, the crowd gathered to hear Fisher Investments CEO Ken Fisher speak Tuesday was hoping  for some news of the company's future in Clark County.

By , Forbes,

It's funny how the stock market deals with impending news. If, for example, you knew with certainty that the world would end in 2020, I'm sure the stock market wouldn't fret over it until about mid-2018. Before then I wouldn't be surprised if we experienced big rallies. The market could go up--and then off a cliff.

By , Interactive Investor,

In my experience, most investors think about time horizon wrongly. They overwhelmingly believe if they are retired or approaching retirement, they must "get conservative" by moving heavily away from shares into bonds. They think if they are 60 and planning on retiring at 65, their investing time horizon is five years

Vancouver Business Journal,

Four years ago, Fisher Investments started moving a portion of it's client service operations to Clark County. Now the investment management firm with $44 billion in assets under management is preparing to take a new step in the process of cementing its future in Southwest Washington.

The Columbian,

California mogul and Forbes columnist Ken Fisher says Clark County can pull itself out of the economic doldrums by doing exactly what it did to bring his company here.

PR.com,

Fisher Investments has begun testing social platforms to expand distribution of its educational content.

Vancouver Business Journal,

Ken Fisher, founder and CEO of Fisher Investments, is perhaps best known for his monthly investment strategy column in Forbes magazine as well as his seven books – four of which have been best sellers.

By , Interactive Investor,

In my 2008 book, The Ten Roads to Riches I wrote that one of the richest roads was becoming the CEO of a big firm. (Nice work if you can get it.)

Forbes,

Fisher Investments Chairman & CEO Ken Fisher has little use for the time-tested investment strategy. He explains why to Steve Forbes.

By , Forbes,

My father, Philip Fisher, always believed management was the key. Warren Buffett said that when great management meets a lousy business it's the management's reputation that changes (and vice versa). They would both agree: A great management in a great business purchased at a great price is, well, great.

Marketwire,

Investment Advisor, a leading publication for independent advisors and financial planners, recognized Fisher Investments' founder and CEO Ken Fisher as one of its 25 most influential people in the advisor community for 2011.

PR Newsire,

SEC Chairman Mary Schapiro leads annual list; exclusive interviews and insights available in the May issue of Investment Advisor and online throughout the month on AdvisorOne.com.

The Street,

Ken Fisher, founder of Fisher Investments, says star CEO's at Costco, Xerox and Papa John's will push their stocks higher.

Q1 2011 corporate profit growth may be more subdued relative to past quarters, but Fisher Investments MarketMinder finds that normal in the course of an ongoing expansion.

Bloomberg, 04/21/2011

Kenneth Fisher, chairman and chief executive officer of Fisher Investments Inc., talks with Bloomberg's Pimm Fox and David Wilson about his market outlook for 2011.

BusinessWire,

Fisher Investments plans to continue hiring in its Vancouver, Washington office throughout the spring and summer months of 2011.

By Ken Fisher, 04/11/11

Ken Fisher explains why he believes the market will likely go sideways for the rest of the year (which does not mean there won't be volatility). Historically, the third year after a stock market bottom generally delivers lackluster returns. He goes on to explain that 2011 can be a good year for stock pickers if they get their bets right.

By , Forbes,

These days one of the biggest stock market obsessions is jobs. Where are they? Why aren't there more? Why can't we create more?

Reuters,

Fisher Investments released its latest Capital Markets Update video—a roundtable discussion with the five members of the firm's Investment Policy Committee (IPC)—outlining their forecast for the balance of 2011 and answering some common investor questions.

BNN,

The U.S. economy will continue on its course of strong growth throughout 2011, but stock markets will take investors for a wild ride, billionaire money manager Ken Fisher, founder and CEO of Fisher Investments, tells BNN.

Marketwire,

Latest Book From Fisher Investments Press Offers a How-To Guide for Investing in the Utilities Sector.

By , Forbes,

Last month I predicted a flattish stock market, frustrating for most, but tailor-made for stock pickers. We have too many bulls and bears--and few in between. The market almost always does what few folks forecast.

Financial Planning,

Taking Apart Investing Myths

Are covered calls better than naked puts? Would two bear markets wipe out a clients’ portfolio? We chatted with Ken Fisher who debunked 50 myths of investing.

PRWeb,

Fisher Investments Press released its latest guide to understanding and investing in the primary investment sectors, Fisher Investments on Health Care.

By , Interactive Investor,

Egypt is cooling down (for now), while Libya's Gaddafi vows to fight to his last drop of blood (and he may get his wish).

Bloomberg,

The money managers who picked the global stock market bottom say now is no time to sell as the biggest equity rally since 1955 starts its third year.

Yahoo! News,

Events in the Middle East have dominated the news in recent weeks, and been a major factor in the rise in energy prices.

AdvisorOne,

Where are the markets now, where are they going and what should advisors and their clients take away from the crisis?

Investment,

Ken Fisher is a relatively new member of the prestigious Forbes 400 Richest People in America list, having been "inducted" in 2005.

Business Wire,

Fisher Investments has redesigned and re-launched its daily news and commentary website, MarketMinder.

By , Forbes,

Interview with Wallace Forbes

By , Reuters,

Bruised but not bowed, bulls staged a rebound on Thursday and helped stocks stabilize in a volatile session suggesting investors aren't ready to give up on the market's rally.

By , The Wall Street Journal,

Oil has always been a wild card for stocks, and its rise to $100 a barrel for the first time since 2008 has investors worried about the nearly uninterrupted run of bullish trading since the autumn.

Reuters,

Billionaire investor Ken Fisher believes bullish sentiment among investors might be getting a little too long in the tooth as large-cap U.S. stocks have doubled in price since their March 2009 lows.

By , Reuters,

Market breadth weakened and a prominent investor retreated from bullish positions as a vulnerable U.S. stock market slipped off 2-1/2-year highs on Tuesday.

PRWeb,

Latest Release from Fisher Investments Press offers a how-to guide for investing in the technology sector.

By , Interactive Investor,

The bull isn't over, but returns will be modest - frustrating both strong bulls and bears.

By , Forbes,

For 15 years FORBES has run an annual accounting of its columnists' recommendations in which we're required to report on the past year's results. In only three years have my picks lagged the S&P 500. Happily, 2010 wasn't among them.

By , Financial Times,

I haven't always seen eye to eye with Ken Fisher, the US market guru. But, in much of his material, he tends to make one very good point: that you almost never get what you might think of as a normal return in stock markets.

By , MoneyWeek,

I haven't always seen eye to eye with Ken Fisher, the US market guru. But, in much of his material, he tends to make one very good point: that you almost never get what you might think of as a normal return in stock markets.

By , Yahoo! Finance UK & Ireland,

I haven't always seen eye to eye with Ken Fisher, the US market guru. But, in much of his material, he tends to make one very good point: that you almost never get what you might think of as a normal return in stock markets.

By , Financial Times,

I haven’t always seen eye to eye with Ken Fisher, the US market guru. But, in much of his material, he tends to make one very good point: that you almost never get what you might think of as a normal return in stock markets.

By , Forbes,

As 2011 begins a little perspective is in order. The global economy has been accelerating over the last six months--just as most expected it to slow or sink into a double-dip recession.

By , Interactive Investor,

Ken Fisher says fears over municipal debt are overblown. Instead, he suggests three 'Tims' for you to back for success.

By , Bloomberg,

Billionaire investor Kenneth Fisher said the biggest U.S. companies will lead global stocks in 2011 even as returns diminish after a 21-month bull market.

By , CNBC,

Markets are going to be "very frustrating" for both bullish and bearish investors next year, according to Ken Fisher, founder and chairman of Fisher Investments and a Forbes columnist.

By , Interactive Investor,

There's so much to be thankful for in 2010. Global shares have rallied strongly since the July low and should end the year up nicely - above average, in fact.

By , Forbes,

Thank the Lord the elections yacking is over. It's been a good year. Stocks and bonds are up, and economies are growing around the world.

By , Interactive Investor,

Third-quarter earnings season in the US is nearly over. And what a season it has been. As I write, 458 of the S&P 500 firms have reported.

The New York Times,

Ken Fisher's Debunkery: Learn It, Do It, and Profit From It makes the New York Times Best Seller business list's top 10.

Fisher Investments Press recently released its latest investment sector guide, Fisher Investments on Utilities. In the guide, authors Andrew Teufel and Theodore Gilliland take an informative look at the industries and sub-industries comprising the sector, how macroeconomic drivers impact it, and the challenges facing Utilities companies, including many electric, gas, and water utilities that are household names.

Citywire,

The UK does not really do investment gurus like the US does. Across the Atlantic, Ken Fisher has penned several bestsellers and is mentioned in the same breath as the likes of Warren Buffett and Jim Rogers, but his profile here is somewhat lower.

Interactive Investor,

Oh no! The Queen cancelled Christmas! Oh well, you have other reasons to be jolly for throughout year-end, share supply is shrinking, a marvellously bullish gift, full of holiday spirit. Plus, demand is too low.

Money Observer,

In this October's edition of the magazine, we reveal the shocking costs of paying fund managers to put your money to work in stock markets.

Reuters,

Sentiment may be sour but a bull market in U.S. stocks that roared in September has more upside, according to billionaire investor Ken Fisher.

Forbes,

I get criticized lots lately for being bullish. I like that, though lately much of it is personal and snarky. I like that even more. Negative, cranky, dour sentiments are great building blocks for bull markets.

Bloomberg,

China has something the U.S. lacks, an airline stock that investors can buy and hold, according to Kenneth Fisher, the billionaire chairman of Fisher Investments Inc. and columnist for Forbes magazine.

Interactive Investor,

Can't come up with reasons to be bullish this year? Here's a big one: Globally, legislatures are gridlocked and getting more so, fast - and stocks love that.

Forbes,

Fisher Investments CEO Ken Fisher likes industries that are mature in developed markets but growing in emerging ones.

By , Forbes,

The post-April stock market correction has been the most textbook perfect I've seen since the one in 1998. That one fed on the Asian contagion, the Russian ruble crisis and the Long-Term Capital Management hedge fund freak-out.

By , Forbes,

I'm sometimes accused of being hostile to mutual funds. That's not fair, really. There is a place for them. Still, I am hostile to one thing, which is trying to use funds to time your way in and out of the market. That's a recipe for very bad results.

Interactive Investor,

Who's afraid of the big bad PIIGS? No one now, it seems. No more headlines, rightfully. I've shown here repeatedly why PIIGS hysteria was just that. As misplaced is today's double-dip phobia.

Bloomberg,

Rising levels of investor pessimism are a reason to buy equities now, billionaire Kenneth Fisher said today. The chief executive officer of Fisher Investments Inc. favors commodity producers after the Standard and Poor's 500 Index dropped 5.1 percent over the last two weeks, according to an interview on Bloomberg Radio.

By , Interactive Investor,

Do you "frack"? You should. It's a funny word but a serious investment. Critics think it's dirty but it's not - and it will change the face of energy production.

By , Interactive Investor,

Do you "frack"? You should. It's a funny word but a serious investment. Critics think it's dirty but it's not - and it will change the face of energy production.

By , Forbes,

Despite its many critics, hydraulic fracturing will change the nature of energy production. Your investments in the energy sector should reflect that fact.

By , Interactive Investor,

Last month I gave you five more reasons to be bullish - and here's another huge one: US firms are cash-rich.

By , Interactive Investor,

Last month I gave you five more reasons to be bullish - and here's another huge one: US firms are cash-rich.

Forbes,

It's simply astounding, after all we've seen in recent decades, that anyone pays attention to credit ratings put out by the officially sanctioned rating agencies.

Forbes,

If you've read me you know I'm bullish, and you know why: Sentiment is snarky, skeptical and pessimistic at a time emerging-markets-led global growth is stronger than folks think. But there are many reasons to expect a good return on stocks in 2010. Here are five you likely haven't heard elsewhere.

PR Newswire,

The editors of Investment Advisor, a leading monthly magazine and web site for wealth management professionals, have selected Ken Fisher, founder and CEO of Fisher Investments, and 29 other well-known investors, executives, regulators and political figures as the 30 most influential individuals in the industry in the last 30 years.

By , Interactive Investor,

Regular readers will know I'm bullish. In March, I gave you six reasons to be bullish, including global growth, led by emerging markets, being stronger than most think. And sentiment being dour - the wall of worry stocks love to climb. Here are five more new ones you won't have heard elsewhere. says Ken Fisher, head of Fisher Wealth Management.

By , Interactive Investor,

Regular readers will know I'm bullish. In March, I gave you six reasons to be bullish, including global growth, led by emerging markets, being stronger than most think. And sentiment being dour - the wall of worry stocks love to climb. Here are five more new ones you won't have heard elsewhere. says Ken Fisher, head of Fisher Wealth Management.

By , Forbes,

It's a year since the bull market began, and I remain firmly bullish. I'm often wrongly called a permabull. I'm not one. In 25 years of FORBES columns I turned bearish for three extended periods: in 1987, in 1990 and between 2000 and 2002.

By , Interactive Investor,

I remain super bullish. Last month I said here that fears of the little PIIGSys would fade - and they are fading.

By , Forbes,

Trying to preserve her youth, Diane de Poitiers, mistress of French King Henry II, died from drinking gold. Today's world is choking on it. My firm's investment counselors get more questions like "What about gold?" than on any other single topic. Overseas investors are particularly smitten.

By , Interactive Investor,

It’s a beautiful world. Sound crazy? It’s not. What’s crazy is fearing debt woes in the five little PIIGSys will stop the 2010 share bull market.

By , Research,

Redwood-rich Woodside, Calif., is geographically and aesthetically about as far away from Wall Street as you can get within the U.S. Yet this small town on the San Francisco Peninsula is headquarters of one of the investment world's foremost experts.

By , Research,

Redwood-rich Woodside, Calif., is geographically and aesthetically about as far away from Wall Street as you can get within the U.S. Yet this small town on the San Francisco Peninsula is headquarters of one of the investment world's foremost experts.

By , Interactive Investor,

Here we go again. World shares fell 3.3% in January (in pound sterling) and the rabble is chanting "so goes January!" It's a popular (and silly) saying, meaning if January's first week is up, the month will be too, and the year.

By , Interactive Investor,

It was recently discovered France's King Henry II's favorite mistress Diane de Poitiers poisoned herself drinking gold - a popular anti-aging remedy in 16th century France. Didn't do her much good, though. Today's world doesn't drink gold, but is choking on it. Everyone wants to talk about gold - itself a bearish sign.

By , Interactive Investor,

A new decade dawns immediately. But this year, instead of Auld Lang Syne, expect to hear "Ye Olde Lost Decade." In Germany they call it the "Nervous Decade." In the US, it's the "New Normal." Media stories abound complaining stocks have been flat and economic growth overall slow for 10 years. It's true! Global stocks annualised just 1.2% and UK shares 1.7 in 10 years.

By , Interactive Investor,

A new decade dawns immediately. But this year, instead of Auld Lang Syne, expect to hear "Ye Olde Lost Decade." In Germany they call it the "Nervous Decade." In the US, it's the "New Normal." Media stories abound complaining stocks have been flat and economic growth overall slow for 10 years. It's true! Global stocks annualised just 1.2% and UK shares 1.7 in 10 years.

PR Newswire,

Fisher Investments, an independent investment advisory firm, announces today career opportunities for Account Executives and Client Services Associates in its Vancouver office.

PR Newswire,

Fisher Investments research report details its current stock market outlook and portfolio insights, now available to individual investors.

By , Interactive Investor,

The US economy soared in the third quarter - up 3.5%, better than expected. China is booming, projected to grow 8.5% in 2009. Europe is mostly growing with some weaker areas. But overall, the world grows again, except poor UK growth was expected. UK GDP fell for a historic sixth quarter in a row, down 0.4%. It's the largest peak-to-trough drop (5.9% so far) since the 1980s.

By , Interactive Investor,

The US economy soared in the third quarter - up 3.5%, better than expected. China is booming, projected to grow 8.5% in 2009. Europe is mostly growing with some weaker areas. But overall, the world grows again, except poor UK growth was expected. UK GDP fell for a historic sixth quarter in a row, down 0.4%. It's the largest peak-to-trough drop (5.9% so far) since the 1980s.

PRWeb,

Tiburon Strategic Advisors, a market research & strategy consulting firm serving a wide variety of financial institutions and investment managers, recently awarded its inaugural Tiburon CEO Summit Awards to Charles Schwab (Chairman, The Charles Schwab Corporation) & Ken Fisher (CEO, Fisher Investments).

By , Interactive Investor,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Financial Planning,

Retention is arguably the most important statistic that captures client satisfaction, argues Ken Fisher, but there is no standardized public disclosure of retention rates. Fisher, CEO and CIO of Fisher Investments, explains what he believes drives this number: "short term stock mark performance. The biggest driver remains stock market volatility," he says.

TheStreet,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Interactive Investor,
Bloomberg,

As Fisher Investments CEO Ken Fisher watched the news coverage of Bernard Madoff’s unraveling Ponzi scheme, he was struck by what the media seemed to always miss when reporting on such scams. Ken Fisher, who's been managing money for individuals and institutions for over 30 years, has identified key traits shared by perpetrators of virtually every major financial fraud through history-from Charles Ponzi to Bernard Madoff.

struck by what the media seemed to always miss when reporting on such scams. Ken Fisher, who's been managing money for individuals and institutions for over 30 years, has identified key traits shared by perpetrators of virtually every major financial fraud through history - from Charles Ponzi to Bernard Madoff.

By , Interactive Investor,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Forbes,
By , Financial Planning,
By , ETF 2X,

Ken Fisher is a successful money manager, writer for Forbes and author. I believe it was in his book The Only Three Questions That Count that he stated that if 65% of your trades are profitable then you will be a very successful money manager. I had to read that statement a second time because I couldn’t believe that you could be so successful with only 65% winning trades but Ken Fisher knows what he is talking about.

By , Interactive Investor,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Think Differently!,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , The Guru Investor,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Success,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , My Venture Pad,

I have been reading Ken Fisher’s The Only Three Questions That Count: Investing by Knowing What Others Don’t. Ken’s focus and business is managing stock portfolios at Fisher Investments but his questions and methods can also be applied to running a business.

By , The Motley Fool,

Why should you invest in small caps -- traditionally viewed as the riskiest class of stocks -- when the sky has been falling on all stocks?

By , Globals [online],
By , Forbes,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , The Motley Fool,
McClatchy-Tribune News Service,
Seeking Alpha,
Seeking Alpha,
Investment Advisor,
By , Bloomberg,
PRWeb,

U.S.-based asset manager Fisher Investments announced IKANO Fund Management's recent decision to hire Fisher Investments to manage a small cap value equity portion of its Portable Alpha Fund and its US Small Cap Equity Fund.

PRWeb,

Fisher Investments, a leading investment adviser and money manager, has been named one of "The Best Places to Launch a Career" in BusinessWeek's third annual survey.

CXO Advisory Group LLC,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Investment News,
Institutional Investor,
By , The Financial Times,
By , The Motley Fool,
By , Investment News,
By , The Oregonian,
By , Investors Chronicle,
By , Portland Business Journal,
By , CNBC,
By , Houston Chronicle,
By , Interactive Investor,
PRWeb,

Fisher Investments, an independent global money management firm, today announced that Investment Advisor (IA) Magazine has named CEO Ken Fisher as one of the top 25 most influential people in the investment advisory universe.

By , Interactive Investor,
By , Forbes,
Equities Magazine,
By , Forbes via Validea.com,
By , The Motley Fool,
By , Interactive Investor,
PR Newswire,

Vancouver, Washington Location to House Additional Firm Staff and Operations.

By , Interactive Investor,
By , Forbes,
The Motley Fool,
Investment Advisor,
MoneyShow.com,
VIDEO: What Earnings Yield Says,
MoneyShow.com,
PR Newswire,

Renowned Investment Management Firm Plans to Pursue Additional Strategic Acquisitions in 2008.

MoneyShow.com,
MoneyShow.com,
MoneyShow.com,
By , Forbes,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Forbes,
Investment News,
The Economist,
By , Financial Times,
By , Bloomberg,
Equities Magazine,
Clip Syndicate,
The Street.com,
Clip Syndicate,
TheStreet.com,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Bloomberg,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , The Guardian,
By , Financial Times,
By , The Street.com,
By , Scotland on Sunday,
By , Interactive Investor,
WinningInvesting.com,
By , Financial Times,
By , The Motley Fool,
By , Forbes,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , allAfrica,

CAN you succeed by banging away at the market with conventional tools -- buying low pies or high momentum or small caps or ... whatever. Can investors make the right decisions based on accepted market truths? And what are those truths?

By , CNBC.com,
By , Interactive Investor,
By , Investment Advisor,
By , Worth,
Investment Advisor,
By , Financial Planning,

Pundits bemoan the fact that America's official personal saving rate turned negative nearly two years ago, and has headed south ever since. Americans aren't saving. Worse still, we're allegedly drowning in debt on a personal level; and, on the national level, the government has profligate spending plans to drive the federal saving rate deeper into negative territory than ever before.

Bloomberg BusinessWeek,

The Only Three Questions That Count ranks #7 on BusinessWeek Hardcover Business Best Seller list

The New York Times,

The Only Three Questions That Count ranks #9 on New York Times Hardcover Advice Best Seller list

By , Reuters,

For Ken Fisher, the key to making money in the markets this year will be to think like a buyout pro.

By , San Francisco Chronicle,

Did anyone predict the end of the stock market bubble?

I used a recently discovered investing Web site to find the answer to that and other stock market questions.

By , Kiplinger,

This Golden State money manager thinks stock buybacks and an M&A boomlet are fueling a bull market.